Gun didn't fire! I need solutions for lubrication.

goldenboy

Well-known member
Ok guys here was my predicament last weekend. I have a sweet O/U Browning white lightning. It has shot flawlessly for me for the 4-5 years that I have owned it. Saturday it refused to fire. I couldn't get a firing pin to work. Got it home took the stock off of it and as near as I can tell here was the problem. When you break open an O/U it cocks the hammers and makes it ready to fire again. When I broke it open it didn't reset the mechanisms. I began to spray gun scrubber throughout the entire inner workings of the gun. Eventually it loosened up, and now it works fine. I have let it sit out on my bench and tried it again yesterday and everything still works fine. My question is what if any lubrication do you put into this part of the gun to keep it moving freely. I know that too much oil of grease will only cause the issue to come back. What have you found to be the right amount of lubrication to work in all temps especially cold weather and what will not just attract more junk to attach and clog the gun up again?
 

jonnyB

Active member
CLP. This recommended by a fellow that writes for the "Shotgun Report." CLP is good to -40. Would assume Rem oil is good, also.

How often is one supposed to clean an over/under?
 

goldenboy

Well-known member
Guys, can you use too much remoil? I am just wondering about gumming up? I have also heard guys who use WD40 since all it is is "water replacement." I also have some dry silicone lubricant has anyone used that?
 

Highvoltage

Member
There are a number of light spray on oils you can use just use them LIGHTLY, and do not use WD40 for it will gum up. If you have been using it in the past that is what got you into trouble.
 

A5 Sweet 16

Active member
Guys, can you use too much remoil? I am just wondering about gumming up? I have also heard guys who use WD40 since all it is is "water replacement." I also have some dry silicone lubricant has anyone used that?
Yes, there's such a thing as too much. Since the inner workings of an O/U are by & large protected from dust/gunk, but also the parts that tend to get cleaned & oiled the least frequently, I'd spray them lightly; then wipe off with a dry cloth. Or....don't spray. Just get a rather oily cloth & try to wipe everything down good. Either way.
 

A5 Sweet 16

Active member
I've heard it recommended to leave the inner workings dry on an O/U too. That may be fine for somebody who shoots clays on sunny days. I have a hard time with it for a field gun.
 

goldenboy

Well-known member
There are a number of light spray on oils you can use just use them LIGHTLY, and do not use WD40 for it will gum up. If you have been using it in the past that is what got you into trouble.
High voltage, I have never had the gun apart to clean the inner workings so now that it is clean and dry it works perfectly. That is why I am wondering if I need anything or just leave it clean and dry without adding stuff that can catch dirt and debris and just cause problems down the road.
 

Highvoltage

Member
I see, well nowthat it is clean I would lightly spray a film on it. Break Free CLP is supposed to be the cats meow, and I have some just haven’t used it yet. Alot of people have Rem oil, that is why I suggested it. Working in the field maintenance for many years, and talking with alot of factory reps they all said if you have WD40 in your truck to throw it away. It may seem to do the trick at first, but when it dries out it becomes more of a problem.
 
This could fall in line with what a garage door guy once told me: stay away from lubricants with silicone. The silicone is what attracts and collects dust/dirt/grime. I've only ever used Break Free CLP and that's served me quite well.
 

birdshooter

Active member
It might be worth your time to take the receiver out of the gun completely, remove the firing pins and soak the whole receiver in mineral spirits for hour. Then blow everything out with compressed air on low pressure. Follow up by cleaning the firing pin channels and pins with Q-tips. Lightly oil channels and pins and then re-install. I can give you a link that shows how to do this tonight if you're not sure how to do this.

This is a protocol I follow once a year with my 725 after a year of shooting Sporting.
 
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birdshooter

Active member
I don't think the manual goes into such detail. It's really not that hard once you've done it once or twice. If you continue to have issues and aside from nothing appearing to be broken or bent e.g. cocking rods, hammers or springs. It's possible that something is gunked up and needs a thorough cleaning.

Lightly oiling can mean different things to different people. Whatever you use just apply a light coating and wipe off any excess. Lots of things can gunk up firing pins and cause them to be sticky. The best way to clean them and the channels is to remove the pins and clean the channels with Q-tips.
 
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A5 Sweet 16

Active member
It might be worth your time to take the receiver out of the gun completely, remove the firing pins and soak in mineral spirits for hour. Then blow everything out with compressed air on low pressure. Follow up by cleaning the firing pin channels and pins with Q-tips. Lightly oil channels and pins and then re-install. I can give you a link that shows how to do this tonight if you're not sure how to do this.

This is a protocol I follow once a year with my 725 after a year of shooting Sporting.
Sounds reasonable. However, I think in goldenboy's case, since he's already had everything apart, sprayed w/ gun scrubber, & things have been working properly....he's essentially accomplished the same thing.
 

birdshooter

Active member
Sounds reasonable. However, I think in goldenboy's case, since he's already had everything apart, sprayed w/ gun scrubber, & things have been working properly....he's essentially accomplished the same thing.
Yep. The complete disassembly as I described could be done as a preventative maintenance procedure, something could be done at your leisure at the end of the season or periodically before you put the gun up till next fall. However, if you've never had the pins out and cleaned them and the channels you would be surprised at how dirty they can become over time. While gun scrubber works well it's not really a substitute for actually taking things out and cleaning and oiling.

I put a fair amount of rounds thru my 725 from spring till early fall so I do this every winter before putting it into the Gun safe till next spring.
 
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I started using fully synthetic motor oil - Mobil 1. Dab it on with a q-tip into places that rub or wear. Otherwise CLP for other areas then wiped down to remove any excess.

My guess is that there are a few areas on the O/U mechanism that one should use a grease but I never use grease. A little Mobil 1 then done.
 
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