What is the best pair of boots you ever owned for hunting pheasants?

cheesy

Well-known member
I ordered a pair of the Russell Signature South 40's in early fall last year, got them right before Christmas, they were just north of $550. The right foot feels awesome after a full day of hunting. The left foot has a couple of 'hot' spots that I need to have them adjust, but overall, I like them a lot.

My wife had got me a gift certificate for them a few years ago, I finally got around to ordering them. In the ordering process, I did a lot of google searches, people either love them or hate them. I'd read some reviews of their quality and attention to detail slipping. I ordered their standard Signature South 40 with no modifications other than my custom sizing. I haven't brought it to their attention, but the soles of the boots I ordered are not the soles of the boots on their webpage. They sent me a more 'comfort' oriented, smoother sole, than the standard on that boot.

I don't know if I'm mad or happy about it. Just kind of goes with some of the reviews I've read about their lack of attention to detail.
 

D Brothers

New member
The last pair of boots I bought for pheasant hunting is a pair of 8 in. Irish Setter Vaprtreks, the uninsulated ones. I also got a nice pair of wool upland socks at the same time, at Scheels. Best money I've ever spent. The first time I wore them, they were on my feet for about 13 hours, and my feet were super comfortable.
 

david0311

Active member
Guess I would have to change th question a little—there is no prefect boot for all season-
However —JMO BUT —I believe for a best all around-fair priced boot—it would be the Danner Pronghorn-or the Browning Kangaroo-if you could still get them-I’m hoarding last couple pair
 

5 stand

Active member
I wear Danner Sharptails,
Good boot for the money.
No break-in. For me. Buy them put them on and go hunting. As always your mileage may vary.
 

NDPheasant

Active member
My wife totally caught me off guard on our 25th Anniversary. I opened up a box only to pull out some Kenetreks. I reluctantly took them off to go to bed but wanted to see a 26th Anniversary. I can't wait to get into the field with them.
 

Nasty-G

Member
I have 2 pairs of go to upland boots. Wet and snow, Lacrosse Grange, mostly dry, Cabela's kangaroo leather. I'm fortunate as my feet don't get cold easily and if they do I get in the truck and warm them.
 
I really found the boot for me in the Cabela's Meindls...good fit on my flat and long feet, and good ankle support. Of course, it doesn't look as tho Cabela's is offering them any more. But, I see Meindl's has a presences in Sidney NE. Prices for similar style are higher, but I'll pay the price for boots that work for me.
 

captainshotgun

New member
I love the old browning kangaroos. I have tried about everything. Since I am only bout 200 mi from the Rocky factory I used to get the uninsulated cornstalkers all of the time. Like the brownings. No longer made. I cant wear muck types. size 9 shoe,size 8 ankle, size 10 calf. I still would like to to find a lace up rubber boot for when it is really wet, like the old red ball ball bands
 

Birdman2

Member
I love the old browning kangaroos. I have tried about everything. Since I am only bout 200 mi from the Rocky factory I used to get the uninsulated cornstalkers all of the time. Like the brownings. No longer made. I cant wear muck types. size 9 shoe,size 8 ankle, size 10 calf. I still would like to to find a lace up rubber boot for when it is really wet, like the old red ball ball bands
Try the Timberland White Ledge. They keep changing the name of the boot. It is 8" boot, very lightweight and comfortable. Hiker..
 

dakotasj

Member
I've always been an Irish Setter boot guy, but tried other brands over the years. Usually leaned toward better quality, with my arches didn't think cheap boots would be a good choice. This year bought a pair of Schnee's Evo Mid on a whim. When I got them I was disappointed at how stiff the sole was, almost sent them back, but they had a 30 day return policy. So I wore them for a few days. Decided to keep them. Two weeks in SD, hot, snow, wet, dry, cold days. By far the best, most comfortable and stable boots I've ever owned.
 

gimruis

Active member
Rocky Cornstalkers. I use them for pheasant hunting, turkey hunting, and deer hunting. They have 500 grams of insulation. I do not hunt when it is above about 60 degrees out so I can't comment on how they do in warm temps.

I will admit that they are not ideal for bitter cold temps in the deer stand, though. This is the second pair that I have owned. The first pair lasted 12 years before they started coming apart and leaking. I had a pair of Redhead boots from Bass Pro for 1 year and then they started taking on moisture so I went back to Rockys, which is what I currently have. This is year 3 for me on them. If they last as long as the first set I had that would be great.
 

Birdman2

Member
I do wear othotics in my Timberland boots. I bet 95% of the people here would benefit using orthotics in their boots.
 
Rocky Cornstalkers. I use them for pheasant hunting, turkey hunting, and deer hunting. They have 500 grams of insulation. I do not hunt when it is above about 60 degrees out so I can't comment on how they do in warm temps.

I will admit that they are not ideal for bitter cold temps in the deer stand, though. This is the second pair that I have owned. The first pair lasted 12 years before they started coming apart and leaking. I had a pair of Redhead boots from Bass Pro for 1 year and then they started taking on moisture so I went back to Rockys, which is what I currently have. This is year 3 for me on them. If they last as long as the first set I had that would be great.
I had a pair back in the day as well. I've become a big fan of their Outback boot. I think Rocky has come out with an upland specific boot as well.
 

Munster927

Active member
My favorite (and current) pair is a pair of Meindl Light Hikers. I got mine from Cabela's about 3 or 4 years ago when Cabela's had a little partnership with Meindl. No longer sold at Cabela's but Meindl still makes them. I've been thinking about ordering a backup pair in case they stop making them someday. They are incredibly light, super comfortable and I can wear them all day long with no pain without any orthodics. And I have about as flat of feet as you can get and some janky toes (thanks mom and dad).

Even in cold weather hunts, I just slip on a pair of warm socks and I'm good down to 0 degrees. I even wear them bow hunting until November haha
 

KSnative

Active member
I ordered a pair of the Russell Signature South 40's in early fall last year, got them right before Christmas, they were just north of $550. The right foot feels awesome after a full day of hunting. The left foot has a couple of 'hot' spots that I need to have them adjust, but overall, I like them a lot.

My wife had got me a gift certificate for them a few years ago, I finally got around to ordering them. In the ordering process, I did a lot of google searches, people either love them or hate them. I'd read some reviews of their quality and attention to detail slipping. I ordered their standard Signature South 40 with no modifications other than my custom sizing. I haven't brought it to their attention, but the soles of the boots I ordered are not the soles of the boots on their webpage. They sent me a more 'comfort' oriented, smoother sole, than the standard on that boot.

I don't know if I'm mad or happy about it. Just kind of goes with some of the reviews I've read about their lack of attention to detail.
Was a big Russell an myself. Wore a pair out, kind of. After re-re-re-repairing and having toe caps added (they were getting very drafty), no longer fit right. I loved those boots so much that I had a funeral for them. Also bought a pair for the wife at least 20 years ago - hers are still good to go despite a fair amount of use. I need some new ones for myself, both set of boots I have now are generally great, but weigh too much and remove too much topsoil when it is wet.

But. Are Russells still made in the USA? I don't mind paying for high quality/good value for the long run but if they aren't made here anymore and quality is slipping as reported - I've bought my last pair.

So - shopping now. Is it my imagination, or do "hunting" boots cost more than essentially identical "work" boots?
 

Dakotazeb

Well-known member
Many very good boots mentioned and recommended throughout this thread. However, proper fitting boots are really a personal issue. What fits and feels good to me may not work for others and vice versa. You really need to try on multiple pairs to get a feel, and even then the true test is in the field. When I was younger most any boot seemed to work but as I aged my feet became more fickle and it became increasingly difficult to find a real comfortable boot. Good luck to all in their search for the ideal boot.
 

KSnative

Active member
Couple more for your consideration/trial: Bates makes some stout, supportive boots, as does Thorogood. Kangaroos (still available?) were super light and comfy, but the pair I had lasted only about half as season before they were toast.
 

Powderhorn Jim

New member
I have "bad feet" - long, narrow, flat arches, hammer toes and the list goes on. I've tried every upland style boot made it seems, including custom made Russel's. This past summer I had ankle surgery, which basically completely realigned my right ankle and partially fused it. None of my previous boots fit, and most I couldn't even get on. I looked at a lot of boots and finally found a pair of Danner "High Ground". They aren't specifically for upland hunting, but the tongue design makes it easy for me to get them on and off and I can lace them very tightly, so they provide an amazing amount of ankle support. I purchased the unlined and lined (400g and 1000g thinsulite) versions). I hunted 14 days straight in Kansas in November in everything from tinder dry, warm to snow, wet conditions. My feet stayed dry and cool or warm, as needed and amazingly, I was able to walk without a lot of pain. I didn't have problems with the toe "dragging" in grass as I have had with other big game hunting boots.

The only down side to this boot, based upon reviews, is that the bottom eyelets are fabric, which eventually wear through and break. The eyelet design, though, is what allows the boot to lace very tightly and conform to your foot. Danner has a one-year warrantee, so as much as I use these boots, if the eyelets are going to go, they will within the warrantee period.

For me, these boots saved my season.
We are done hunting for the winter so I have time to update this. After Danner replaced six pair of their High Ground boots because the fabric eyelets would wear and break they finally quit making that boot. They do make another boot, the "Vital" that is made on the same last but with metal tube lower eyelets and a somewhat different fabric/leather arrangement. I was skeptical but went ahead and had them replace a pair of the High Grounds with the Vital this summer. I wore them all summer, haying, irrigating, hiking and finally hunting. Surprisingly I found them even better than the High Grounds. I can lace them up like a cast and walk all day in all kinds of conditions. I wore them 19 days straight this fall in Kansas in snow, mud and extremely dry conditions. No problems at all and my feet didn't hurt! I've had Cabela's lightweight kangaroo boots (very little support, the toe caps wore off in one season), Red Wing (floppy, didn't fit well); and custom Russel's (fit well, couldn't really lace them tight enough, had them rebuilt - at my cost, very difficult to get off with a fused ankle). The Danner Vital solved all of these problems. If you have narrow feet, ankle problems, etc. might give them a try.
 
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