Older retriever

Gatzby

Member
It does have side effects and I would use it on an older dog that had an underlining health issue such as cancer. But not on an 8 year old dog with a lot of life left. I can't figure out why some on here are suggesting giving Rimadyl for a dog that doesn't have any known problems other than being over weight. The dog isn't sick it has just been short sided as far as exercise and food goes. Medicine would be the last thing I would suggest. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterina...ell-clients-about-pain-control-and-their-pets
Is it possible you are confusing Rimidayl with another drug. Rimidayl is an anti inflammatory used for arthritis, post surgery pain killer etc. Please understand i’m not saying someone should use it or not use it, I’m just trying to add information.

Quote from my veterinary medicine for dummies book
Rimidayl is one of the brand names for the veterinary drug carprofen. Carprofen belongs to a group of drugs called NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. These drugs act to reduce inflammation with fewer negative side effects than steroids, making them more suitable than steroids for long-term use.

Carprofen is safer for use in dogs than human NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, naproxen, or aspirin, which is why it is one of the more commonly prescribed veterinary canine painkillers”
 

Dakotazeb

Well-known member
It does have side effects and I would use it on an older dog that had an underlining health issue such as cancer. But not on an 8 year old dog with a lot of life left. I can't figure out why some on here are suggesting giving Rimadyl for a dog that doesn't have any known problems other than being over weight. The dog isn't sick it has just been short sided as far as exercise and food goes. Medicine would be the last thing I would suggest. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterina...ell-clients-about-pain-control-and-their-pets
When I recommended Rimadyl I should have explained a little more. The OP said his dog was stiff and sore after a day of hunting. I would give Rimadyl on an as needed basis. Not as a daily medication. Of course since Rimadyl is a prescription drug you need to get it from a vet and should consult with the vet as to it's use. Limited use would have little if any side effects and it's safer and more effective than aspirin.
 

westksbowhunter

Active member
All dogs are stiff and sore the day after a hunt, especially when they do nothing 360 days per year. He said the dog was fine the next morning. Sounds like every hunting dog I have ever known. Water and high quality food are all that is needed for recovery, along with a good nights rest.
 
In my non-educated opinion, worth a shot to try Glucosamine. I keep my lab in pretty good year round shape, but in year 7 I started noticing some stiffness in days after hunts, some mornings after day 2-3-4 of SD trips he could hardly walk when he woke up, then would move around a bit and be fine shortly after. In year 8 I started Glucosamine and he became a new dog, dang near like a puppy again. I'm excited for year 9 this fall, and am pretty confident that if he was not on glucosamine that he would not be the dog he is.

An 8-9 year old dog is in the "end of the middle" or the "beginning of the end" of their hunting career. Kind of where Aaron Rodgers is in his career, still hopefully has a few good years ahead but it's time to start thinking about a replacement. Not quite to where Drew Brees and Tom Brady are, basically at the end physically wise but mentally (or nose of a dog) as good as they've ever been and that's enough to keep them going.
 

Chestle

Member
This is not directed at the OP nor the discussion of food/exercise vs meds for an older overweight dog. This is just something I tried and it worked pretty well in my situation as an alternative to the NSAIDs or Carprofen or Meloxicam.

I have a small 55lb chocolate lab that is now 15 years and 7 months. She was always an indefatigable hard go-er in the field and training environments. When she was 12, she blew out her right ACL (the right rear). They opted for no surgery in a dog this old; just keep her rather sedate and let it get arthritis and lock up on it's own. (Yeah, I know. But that was advice from 3 different vets).

Anyway, this last 6 months or so that leg has become pretty weak and clearly painful. A friend suggested SummitJP. This friend has used it on horses with much success. So I gave it a go on my old girl. It did not work miracles but it CLEARLY improved the situation and quickly. I could see a difference abour 4 days after the shot. She has more mobility and shows less stiffness. They suggest 1 shot every 4 weeks but say you can do it every week if you think the dog needs it. We're on a 3 week rotation. I can see a difference in her mobility as it starts to wear off around then.

What is it? https://summitjp.com/faq/?u=csequine&r=C4874

" Q. What is Summit?


A. Summit is simply chondroitin 4 sulfate (C4S), suspended in sterile water. Summit was originally developed to use in human ocular lens transplant surgeries. Summit is the purest form of C4S available. Unlike other products, it has had all heparins and other potentially damaging molecules removed from the single C4S molecule. Summit is an all-natural product, not a synthetic created in the lab, nor polysulfated. Summit has an incredibly low molecular weight, and its small size allows it to penetrate barriers in the body, like joint capsules, much easier than other products. A large percentage of the molecules that make up tissues in the joints is C4S. Replenishing these structures with nature’s version of this important molecule, instead of synthetic lab creations that are over 100x the molecular weight, is of great benefit."


Obviously, Your Mileage May Vary. Feel free to tell me I'm crazy, that this is dangerous for the dog...whatever. It clearly eases her life and she's going to keep getting it. Just thought I'd throw it out there for those who might want an alternative to NSAIDs et al.
 

Labs

Member
In my formative years as a trainer I was told "watch the dog, not the food bowl". In other words, if the dog starts putting on weight, cut back the food. Great advice. Each of my 4 labs gets their own individual amount of food per day as each has a very different metabolism. During the season when they are working hard they get more. I have one female I call my super-model, feed her a bit too much in the off season or a few too many treats and she puts on visible weight very quickly. Her daily ration is typically half or less than that which my very active high energy male gets.

I have a 14 year old female lab I finally retired this year due to a torn ACL and just old age. She hunted well right through last season. She gets a couple glucosamine treats a day, plus a Rymadl (prescription anti-inflammitory & pain reducer) every morning. I normally wouldn't give Rym every day, but the vet advised keeping my old kennel queen comfortable outweighs the negatives. If your dogs hunt & train hard, keeping Rym on hand is a good idea for an as needed treatment, even if they aren't older. Never had any issues with side effects...
 
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"watch the dog, not the food bowl". In other words, if the dog starts putting on weight, cut back the food. Great advice. Each of my 4 labs gets their own individual amount of food per day as each has a very different metabolism.
Would completely agree, in 99% of the cases an overweight dog is the fault of the owner. Just like in humans, in 99% of the overweight humans, the fault is on the individual themselves.
 
I've used Rimadyl for over 20 years and have never seen or experienced any side effects. Actually I have never even heard of any side effects associated with Rimadyl. From the vets I've talked to they would recommend Rimadyl over Aspirin.
I have used both, and have not seen side effects that are real noticeable. I try to give a pill before hunting, and after, after the age of 6, or even before that age.
 
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