A ? for pheasant pluckers

quail hound

Moderator
I took the time today to pluck 2 birds and I must say they're the best I've ever done but when you're done plucking you end up with a nice birds with a lot of little "hairs" left if you know what I mean. I've cooked them in the past with these hairs left on but what is the best way to get rid of them? Hold the bird over hot coals to singe them off maybe?
 

abraun

New member
phez

Get a large pan , 3/4 water, boil the water and put the bird in. You can do this with the whole bird it will help get all the feathers off easier.
 

HolyMoses

New member
When we pluck birds, which we don't do often anymore, we use a torch to singe the leftover hair. Doesn't smell the greatest, but it works.
 

PTM

Member
Wax

We used to dip plucked birds in a wax and after it dried peel it off. The propane torch is much quicker.
 

ditchparrot19

New member
Get a large pan , 3/4 water, boil the water and put the bird in. You can do this with the whole bird it will help get all the feathers off easier.
It's best to let the water cool a bit after bringing it to a boil and before dunking the fully feathered bird, as 212 degrees (or even 200) is a bit too hot. It makes the skin too loose and can actually start to cook the meat a little.

I've done some experimenting with this and have found the best temperature range is from about 160 to 190. The skin stays fairly tight, but the feathers come off easily.

If you're doing a bunch of birds at one time, you'll likely need to dump your water and boil up a new pot. I can usually get through about three birds per pot before the water gets too cool.

I'm really not sure if the hairs are still there or not, since the skin is damp at that time.
 

quail hound

Moderator
Thanks for the help guys, I ended up using a camp stove to singe them after I dialed in a nice blue flame. I'm really pleased with my effort.



In the brine and roasting for dinner tomorrow.

 

Dakotazeb

Active member
QH, nice looking birds. Were these some tame one's you caught? :) They look very plump and it doesn't look like a pellet in either bird.

Much better than the one I shot yesterday. He wasn't that close but I must have centered the pattern on him. One side of the breast was peppered and both legs were broken. :(
 

quail hound

Moderator
They were both very wild. One had a broken wing, one piece of shot in the breast and a couple in the back just behind the wing. The others neck was shot up pretty bad but that's it. I'm mostly a quail hunter so I like hitting birds with just the edge of the pattern.:D:cheers:
 

quail hound

Moderator
QH, nice looking birds. Were these some tame one's you caught? :) They look very plump and it doesn't look like a pellet in either bird.

Much better than the one I shot yesterday. He wasn't that close but I must have centered the pattern on him. One side of the breast was peppered and both legs were broken. :(
Oh and the one on the right was gorged beyond belief on barley and the one on the left was only eating weed seeds and grasshoppers.:confused:
 

FCSpringer

Super Moderator
If I ever decide to go to that effort then I smoke them. Emmm Emmm. Yes the hand torch works great to get the hair. They look great.
 

bknight

New member
It's best to let the water cool a bit after bringing it to a boil and before dunking the fully feathered bird, as 212 degrees (or even 200) is a bit too hot. It makes the skin too loose and can actually start to cook the meat a little.

I've done some experimenting with this and have found the best temperature range is from about 160 to 190. The skin stays fairly tight, but the feathers come off easily.

If you're doing a bunch of birds at one time, you'll likely need to dump your water and boil up a new pot. I can usually get through about three birds per pot before the water gets too cool.

I'm really not sure if the hairs are still there or not, since the skin is damp at that time.
This is good advice. If the hairs remain a torch or just a rolled up lighted newspaper sheet will work to singe these hairs. They are vestigial feathers and are present on all birds. You could dry the skin after plucking with paper towel and then use a flame to quickly burn them away, just don't burn yourself.
 

calamari

New member
Nice job Robert. Taking the time to pluck your birds is showing them the respect they deserve. Once again your stock has gone up 10 points.:10sign:
 
little hairs

for years i have used a flame on all my birds i pluck esp. waterfowl and turkey, pheasants aren't quiet the problem. wax is a mess but works well. if you are using water, there is a better way

cheers
 
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