Shooting

TBIRD19

New member
I've noticed myself missing a lot of first shots but hitting on the second. Any general theories as to why on this? Rushing? Seems like I shoot my first and then dial in on the second based off the miss. I dont feel as if im rushing but having a tough time drawing and getting on it for the first shot.

-Thanks
 
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A5 Sweet 16

Member
I've noticed myself missing a lot of first shots but hitting on the second. Any general theories as to why on this? Rushing? Seems like I shoot my first and then dial in on the second based off the miss. I dont feel as if im rushing but having a tough time drawing and getting on it for the first shot.

-Thanks
My theory, based on LOTS of pheasant hunting, is that yes, you're probably rushing, but there may be a little more to it. It's so easy to be flustered by a flush, so we think the bird will be gone before we know it, so I have to get my shot off quick. This isn't usually the case. But it takes experience & the confidence gained from it to be able to take that extra second, collect your wits, get your footing right, safety off, get the barrel moving and outward & stock up to your shoulder/face....all while seeing the bird as clearly as possible & focusing on its head/beak (not that huge tail). Taking that extra second helps your brain really see how fast & what direction the bird is moving & before you know it, your barrel is moving & pretty well in the right spot at the same time your mount is completed. I think a lot of people SNAP the gun up first, & then all the other stuff has to catch up, which is difficult with a gun mounted. Instinct tell us to SHOOT as soon as our gun is mounted; not do all the other stuff. It's simply a function of practice. Also, I see a lot of people carry their guns down at their sides or over the shoulder. MUCH easier to quickly do the things described above from a port arms carry position. My $0.02.
 

TBIRD19

New member
My theory, based on LOTS of pheasant hunting, is that yes, you're probably rushing, but there may be a little more to it. It's so easy to be flustered by a flush, so we think the bird will be gone before we know it, so I have to get my shot off quick. This isn't usually the case. But it takes experience & the confidence gained from it to be able to take that extra second, collect your wits, get your footing right, safety off, get the barrel moving and outward & stock up to your shoulder/face....all while seeing the bird as clearly as possible & focusing on its head/beak (not that huge tail). Taking that extra second helps your brain really see how fast & what direction the bird is moving & before you know it, your barrel is moving & pretty well in the right spot at the same time your mount is completed. I think a lot of people SNAP the gun up first, & then all the other stuff has to catch up, which is difficult with a gun mounted. Instinct tell us to SHOOT as soon as our gun is mounted; not do all the other stuff. It's simply a function of practice. Also, I see a lot of people carry their guns down at their sides or over the shoulder. MUCH easier to quickly do the things described above from a port arms carry position. My $0.02.
Thanks A5, exactly the sort of elaboration I was looking for more than the short answer of "rushing". Many good points noted. Especially the SNAP & SHOOT logic, I can totally relate to that. Thanks for taking the time. lots of help. Keeping these theories in mind while afield
 

Dakotazeb

Active member
I think A5 Sweet 16 makes some good points. I would also ask the following:

What gun are you shooting?
What gauge are you shooting?
What is your gun choked?
What is the length of barrel?
What shells are you shooting?
What size shot?
 

davidtodd

New member
My experience after over 50 years of shotgunning is that the first shot on a bird is often high , and if it is a crossing shot, behind as well, same as on a skeet field .
When the bird is flushed a rushed shot normally involves the cheek off the gun ( hence the high shot) and pointing directly at the bird instead of leading and swinging ( resulting in missing behind)
Regardless of the gun I am using , if I miss , I know exactly why and can correct on the second shot ( hopefully!)😜
DT
 

birdshooter

Active member
My theory, based on LOTS of pheasant hunting, is that yes, you're probably rushing, but there may be a little more to it. It's so easy to be flustered by a flush, so we think the bird will be gone before we know it, so I have to get my shot off quick. This isn't usually the case. But it takes experience & the confidence gained from it to be able to take that extra second, collect your wits, get your footing right, safety off, get the barrel moving and outward & stock up to your shoulder/face....all while seeing the bird as clearly as possible & focusing on its head/beak (not that huge tail). Taking that extra second helps your brain really see how fast & what direction the bird is moving & before you know it, your barrel is moving & pretty well in the right spot at the same time your mount is completed. I think a lot of people SNAP the gun up first, & then all the other stuff has to catch up, which is difficult with a gun mounted. Instinct tell us to SHOOT as soon as our gun is mounted; not do all the other stuff. It's simply a function of practice. Also, I see a lot of people carry their guns down at their sides or over the shoulder. MUCH easier to quickly do the things described above from a port arms carry position. My $0.02.

+1

I agree that you are likely rushing and or having foot placement issues.
 

birdshooter

Active member
I've noticed myself missing a lot of first shots but hitting on the second. Any general theories as to why on this? Rushing? Seems like I shoot my first and then dial in on the second based off the miss. I dont feel as if im rushing but having a tough time drawing and getting on it for the first shot.

-Thanks
I posted this a while back, two short instruction videos on foot work and gun mount as it relates to wingshooting. Both of which can be practiced at home with an UNLOADED gun.

https://www.ultimatepheasanthunting.com/forum/showthread.php?23301-Practice-makes-perfect
 
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BigRand

Member
I used to run into this issue when I was in my teens and shooting with my dad. He was a bit faster than I was and I know I was rushing. Now in my 30's and hunting with my own dog and notice I miss a lot less than I did with him. We still hunt together quite a bit but our shots are almost simultaneous now. Either he's slowed a bit in his 50's or I've gained a bit after 20 years of shooting experiences. One thing I have started doing is anytime I stop I have my feet in a shooting position. Took some practice to train myself to that but now it's second nature.
 

PTM

Member
I would throw out there if your mounting your gun and waiting for the bird to create distance a guy or gal can end up aiming taking the focus off the bird and onto your bead, a recipe for a follow up shot. Good shooters like Quailhound or CarpTom or pulling the trigger shortly after they mount, a very instinctive or snapshot style. Your choke also may be tight for close flushing birds.
 

A5 Sweet 16

Member
I would throw out there if your mounting your gun and waiting for the bird to create distance a guy or gal can end up aiming taking the focus off the bird and onto your bead, a recipe for a follow up shot. Good shooters like Quailhound or CarpTom or pulling the trigger shortly after they mount, a very instinctive or snapshot style. Your choke also may be tight for close flushing birds.
Yep. First, when you're able to take a second & get your feet set right, the bird creates its own distance. By not mounting the gun immediately, you're seeing the bird more clearly & better able to focus on its head. Your brain takes over, getting your gun swinging as you mount it (if not before), such that at the point your gun is completely mounted, lead has been accomplished & you're ready to pull the trigger. It's one smooth operation, rather than a mount plus a swing/shot.
 

PTM

Member
Jon although you are a fine wing shot, I attribute most of your success to the excellent work of your k9 partner Max, he gives you an unfair advantage. ��
 

carptom1

Active member
I would throw out there if your mounting your gun and waiting for the bird to create distance a guy or gal can end up aiming taking the focus off the bird and onto your bead, a recipe for a follow up shot. Good shooters like Quailhound or CarpTom or pulling the trigger shortly after they mount, a very instinctive or snapshot style. Your choke also may be tight for close flushing birds.
Patrick it is funny you say that as I have always been a snap shooter. I typically carry a lighter gun and am always at a ready position. I have found i loose that instinctive shooting ability when I carry the gun at my side or over my shoulder. You will almost never see me carry it like that unless walking out of a field. On the flush I will say I rarely miss. The issues I have are with pass shooting or longer shots. I believe I try to press those with the perfect lead or think about it too much.Perfect example was last Friday while we were hunting. Missed the first bird twice ( long shot angling away) on that multiple flush, then killed the next 3 with 3 shots on the rise while breaking open a double and loading twice. That probably stems from the fact that I rarely shoot trap or skeet, in fact I have not practiced shooting in a long time. Often it is about a year between me picking up a gun. If I practiced those pass shots I would imagine the instinct would come. Like most things in my life too much thinking leads to over complication and eventual failure.
 

PTM

Member
I had a couple epic misses on our trip, one was a close flushing rooster that got hung up in the cattails, I did as I described and premounted the gun, whiffed and then heard Brian mutter come on Man, I started laughing it was pretty funny. I’ve found the best recipie for those are to block them out and move on. One other thing is a straight away bird is probably gaining altitude that is undecernable to the shooter. The tendency for clays is to bust them right before they start going down. To me like you said if a guy just shoots without thinking about it it usually ends with a downed bird. As I’ve gotten older I don’t step into Birds like I should but end up in a failed mister twister pose. I wish we were back there already. Self analyzing my shooting is more intriguing than any of the current news stories.
 

carptom1

Active member
I had a couple epic misses on our trip, one was a close flushing rooster that got hung up in the cattails, I did as I described and premounted the gun, whiffed and then heard Brian mutter come on Man, I started laughing it was pretty funny. I’ve found the best recipie for those are to block them out and move on. One other thing is a straight away bird is probably gaining altitude that is undecernable to the shooter. The tendency for clays is to bust them right before they start going down. To me like you said if a guy just shoots without thinking about it it usually ends with a downed bird. As I’ve gotten older I don’t step into Birds like I should but end up in a failed mister twister pose. I wish we were back there already. Self analyzing my shooting is more intriguing than any of the current news stories.
That's funny he would say that with the way he shoots. Didn't he run out of shells after the second field with like one bird to show for it?
 

PTM

Member
Maybe, but this pheasant I missed was like suspended in mid flight from the tangle of cattails, gave extra time for me to prepare, and it’s top speed was about 40 percent of a regular pheasant, I got two immediately after that. I believe the comment to be appropriate, we both had a good laugh, we finished the day together. My porcupine victim put somethings together and was showing some good promise for the future. The problem with those SD trips is they go by too fast.
 
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