Know how to ask.

McFarmer

Member
Some folks just get themselves crossways right off the start. This is a dialog from a phone call this morning, 7:30.

Phone rings

McFarmer : hello.

Hunter: do you own land on the west side of the lake ?

McFarmer: who’s calling ?

Hunter: *states name*

McFarmer: yes we do.

Hunter: can I hunt there ?

McFarmer: hunt what ?

Hunter: geese.

McFarmer: all this land is in a Canada goose refuge.

Hunter: my buddies hunt geese all around the lake.

McFarmer: well, I don’t know about your buddies but this side of the lake is a refuge.

Hunter: no, the only waterfowl protection area is south of the lake.

McFarmer: I didn’t say a protection area, I said refuge.

Hunter: it’s the same thing.

McFarmer: whatever, I guess the answer is no.

Hunter: oh. *hangs up*

Let’s hear some other landowner stories about how not to ask for permission, or how not to treat the privilege. I’ve had the pleasure of hosting many hunters, deer, duck, pheasant or whatever. Many bird watchers also. People who enjoy the outdoors are some of the nicest folks around. But, it’s human nature to remember the bad apples longer than the others. Probably an evolutionary thing.
 

david0311

Member
Not surprised—

Due to my job —had to have public phone access at home—
Unreal how stupid/rude/ignorant some people are—
Can’t count the number of times people would call for a point of law—and then they would argue with you —(as in above example)—.
These calls were especially appreciated at 1:00 AM with the drunk calling and the juke box playing in the back round—
SOLUTION TO ABOVE—TELL THEM YOU DONT KNOW THE ANSWER—GET HOME PHONE NUMBER-CALL ABOUT 4 30AM WITH ANSWER:mad::rolleyes:

However my immediate turn off was—answering the phone—and person calling -opening with—WHO IS THIS-INSTANTANEOUS P#3%& off-
;
 

Matt D

Member
I handle permission for our land here in Ohio and it is a never ending situation of weird texts and phone calls it seems. Known unethical groups always pushing the boundary and having a different person from their group ask for permission with the plan to then come through and drive everything off our ground. Early on the trick was to always say they had hit one and it ran on our property and could they go recover it. They know my answer is going to be just wait right there and I’ll be up shortly and will to track it with the shooter. Otherwise their recovery just becomes a deer drive. We have a farm that butts up to a wildlife refuge that is awesome waterfowl hunting so I get lots of calls asking for permission there but have a guy that has hunted it for the last 10 years so easy out on that.

Best thing we have done is get to know the game wardens really well. As a matter fact Sunday night game Worden stopped at my house as there was a truck parked on the property line down the road and he wanted to make sure was someone with permission since he knows no one else should be in there. It was the neighbors boy hunting their property so was all good. Having good neighbors is always key also and thankfully we do for the most part.

McFarmer - sorry you had to deal with an inconsiderate and uninformed hunter.
 

BRITTMAN

Active member
Flip side is true also. I have run into some rather ornery and down right strange farmers out there. Banjo plays in the background. There were farms that my brother refused to visit or even call during hunting season because the guy was so darn angry or odd. But I get it. Farming can be a very difficult lifestyle often with high stress, loneliness, debt, divorce, family in-fighting (often your business partners) and alcoholism to name a few.

Hunters also rarely know what prior experiences the landowner has had (recent or long ago) with other hunters. Politeness can be a two-way street.
 
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BRITTMAN

Active member
My brother was a well known and very well respected state employee Ag Specialist. Much like a farmer in prime hunting country ... his phone rang all the time ... most often in the evening and late evening when it was family time with farmers asking for advise. He nearly always answered the phone and was polite and helpful.

Eventually he took his expertise private with his clients receiving the attention they needed to succeed.
 
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Best time to ask is summer time, show up with a friendly hand shake and a pair of work gloves and boots. Fall is extremely busy and stressful time for farmers and ranchers, especially this fall in many areas, combing is late, winter is early. I am guessing most farmers and ranchers with good cover are inundated with request this time of year. best remember that.
 

McFarmer

Member
Best time to ask is summer time, show up with a friendly hand shake and a pair of work gloves and boots. Fall is extremely busy and stressful time for farmers and ranchers, especially this fall in many areas, combing is late, winter is early. I am guessing most farmers and ranchers with good cover are inundated with request this time of year. best remember that.
Folks on here talk about helping out the farmer, good deal if it works for them I guess. Myself I can’t think of a job I would trust someone off the street to help with, much less do. Picking up rocks is the only thing that comes to mind.
 

Goosemaster

New member
Flip side is true also. I have run into some rather ornery and down right strange farmers out there. Banjo plays in the background. There were farms that my brother refused to visit or even call during hunting season because the guy was so darn angry or odd. But I get it. Farming can be a very difficult lifestyle often with high stress, loneliness, debt, divorce, family in-fighting (often your business partners) and alcoholism to name a few.

Hunters also rarely know what prior experiences the landowner has had (recent or long ago) with other hunters. Politeness can be a two-way street.
I agree, some farmers are not friendly. All it takes, is one hunter pissing them off, and they will remember it, rest assured. I can almost look at a farm, and have an idea of weather U can get on. The nice farms, usually say no.Big farms, will have outfitters, or charge money.
 
Folks on here talk about helping out the farmer, good deal if it works for them I guess. Myself I can’t think of a job I would trust someone off the street to help with, much less do. Picking up rocks is the only thing that comes to mind.
That is sad, here in Montana, I know quite a few folks who help a rancher or farmer, hell, I have helped wire shops, look at electrical problems on my own time....I know lots of locals who show up to help brand and combine....guess that is why we say: Montana, the last best place!
 

McFarmer

Member
Flip side is true also. I have run into some rather ornery and down right strange farmers out there. Banjo plays in the background. There were farms that my brother refused to visit or even call during hunting season because the guy was so darn angry or odd. But I get it. Farming can be a very difficult lifestyle often with high stress, loneliness, debt, divorce, family in-fighting (often your business partners) and alcoholism to name a few.

Hunters also rarely know what prior experiences the landowner has had (recent or long ago) with other hunters. Politeness can be a two-way street.

So which part of your description of the “farming lifestyle” differs from any other lifestyle ?
 
I agree, some farmers are not friendly. All it takes, is one hunter pissing them off, and they will remember it, rest assured. I can almost look at a farm, and have an idea of weather U can get on. The nice farms, usually say no.Big farms, will have outfitters, or charge money.
Naw...they just have good intuition. I hunt on absolutely fantastic farms, year after year, most are posted, keep the riff raff out....you know, the users, people who think they are entitled to it, yet wouldn't know the rancher or farmer from Adam.
 

McFarmer

Member
I know lots of locals who show up to help brand and combine....guess that is why we say: Montana, the last best place!
That’s a little different than just showing up, asking what can you help with in exchange for hunting. The term “locals” is a little different than “someone off the street”. I doubt any farmer or rancher would welcome an unknown person to run the combine, or anything of consequence for that matter.

The talk I’m referring to deals with introducing yourself and being prepared with gloves and work boots. I can’t see that flying with anyone, but other areas are different.
 

Goosemaster

New member
I agree, some farmers are not friendly. All it takes, is one hunter pissing them off, and they will remember it, rest assured. I can almost look at a farm, and have an idea of weather U can get on. The nice farms, usually say no.Big farms, will have outfitters, or charge money.
However, I'm going to help a guy at some point.The thing is, when you live hundreds of miles away, its hard to help.I know a guy, who only has 100 acres, that's all his dad gave him.He has a deep cut, loaded with birds of all kinds.He let me on, because I was by myself, and driving a 72 Ford. I am going to send him a gift at Christmas, and I would work out there. This guys dad, is a hard core, and never lets anybody hunt, unless they slip him a few C notes, which is not uncommon these days.
 

Westok

New member
It’s not a customer store owner relationship. The farmer isn’t asking or wanting anyone to ask to hunt, it’s a hassle to deal with. No other occupation has people come in and ask for free stuff, then a lot of times act pissed that your not happy they did. I’d always ask if I could pay or do something. As for rude behavior you might be the last in a long line of people asking for something that farmer doesn’t want to give, and never wanted to be asked about.
 

BRITTMAN

Active member
Nothing really except maybe geographical isolation. There are happy people and angry people. Which are you ?
 

BRITTMAN

Active member
I have delivered meals into a field, repaired fencing and helped drive cattle down gravel roads (pasture to farm homestead). That said, I was more than familiar with these farmer/ranchers.

Sending a gift and a thank you after a hunt or during the holidays is always nice.

In ND accepting cash for hunting flips the liability of the landowner from none to full for any issues or accidents that may occur on his land.

ND Century Code
53-08-03. Not invitee or licensee of landowner.
Subject to the provisions of section 53-08-05, an owner of land who either directly or
indirectly invites or permits without charge any person to use such property for recreational
purposes does not thereby:
1. Extend any assurance that the premises are safe for any purpose;
2. Confer upon such persons, or any other person whose presence on the premises is
directly derived from those recreational purposes, the legal status of an invitee or
licensee to whom a duty of care is owed other than a person that enters land to
provide goods or services at the request of, and at the direction or under the control of,
the owner; or
3. Assume responsibility for or incur liability for any injury to person or property caused
by an act or omission of such persons.
 

BRITTMAN

Active member
Unfortunately rural people probably have less access to help or are "too proud" to accept it.

A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggested that male farmers in 17 states took their lives at a rate two times higher than the general population in 2012 and 1.5 times higher in 2015. This, however, could be an underestimate, as the data collected skipped several major agricultural states, including Iowa. Rosmann and other experts add that the farmer suicide rate might be higher, because an unknown number of farmers disguise their suicides as farm accidents.
In October 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that the rates of drug overdose deaths are rising in rural areas, surpassing rates in urban areas. In addition, a December 2017 survey by the National Farmers Union and the American Farm Bureau Federation found that as many as 74 percent of farmers have been directly impacted by the opioid crisis.

Under the leadership of President Donald J. Trump, USDA is approaching the opioid crisis with a dedicated urgency. The opioid epidemic is devastating to its victims and their families. It has a compounding ripple effect throughout communities, affecting quality of life, economic opportunity, and rural prosperity. No corner of our country has gone untouched by the opioid crisis, but the impact of this issue on small towns and rural places has been particularly significant.
Then there is SD's Meth problem which is apparently growing fastest in rural areas.


By the way my family has been impacted by both of the above and alcoholism in major ways - tied primarily to rural / farm lifestyles.
 
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reddog

Active member
Some folks just get themselves crossways right off the start. This is a dialog from a phone call this morning, 7:30.

Phone rings

McFarmer : hello.

Hunter: do you own land on the west side of the lake ?

McFarmer: who’s calling ?

Hunter: *states name*

McFarmer: yes we do.

Hunter: can I hunt there ?

McFarmer: hunt what ?

Hunter: geese.

McFarmer: all this land is in a Canada goose refuge.

Hunter: my buddies hunt geese all around the lake.

McFarmer: well, I don’t know about your buddies but this side of the lake is a refuge.

Hunter: no, the only waterfowl protection area is south of the lake.

McFarmer: I didn’t say a protection area, I said refuge.

Hunter: it’s the same thing.

McFarmer: whatever, I guess the answer is no.

Hunter: oh. *hangs up*

Let’s hear some other landowner stories about how not to ask for permission, or how not to treat the privilege. I’ve had the pleasure of hosting many hunters, deer, duck, pheasant or whatever. Many bird watchers also. People who enjoy the outdoors are some of the nicest folks around. But, it’s human nature to remember the bad apples longer than the others. Probably an evolutionary thing.

Back in my glory days, I would ask to hunt anywhere and everywhere if I wanted to hunt it. I got turned down some, but I got let go more times than not. Alot of those cold calls,(ill never call or text to ask permission unless the relationship is already secure) turned into life long friendships, or which at this point in time, I have outlived most of those contacts. Plus, almost every piece of ground I earned permission on, is now DNR or federal land. The older I get, the less likely I am to ask, so there fore, I do less hunting and more fishing.. Two experiences stand out, actually 3. One has to do with pheasants.. I asked permission for a couple years in a row and got turned down, then I asked if I could hunt coyotes and that got my foot in the door... for good. But, if I went there when he wasnt busy, I had to take him hunting with me. :) Another situation centered around asking to hunt a fox on a piece of land back in the early 80s . Knocked on guys at 10:30 am on a saturday. Told him there was a fox out in his section and asked if he minded if I went out to try to get it. His face turned a Heinz Ketchup red, and he started poking me in the chest, saying no, absolutely not, and if you do go I'm going to call the sheriff. I proceeded to tell him that a simple no was sufficient, and Id be on my way. One other "situation" revolved around asking for another fox. About 830 on a saturday, I was met by the lady of the house at the front door, fresh out of the shower, if you get my drift.. She did have a gown on, but it left little to the imagination.. I drive by there occasionally and :)
 
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