Injured dog in the field

I'm wondering if you guys have a plan if your dog sustains a severe injury in the field? I have been doing a lot of research on this myself, and have ordered a book specifically on sporting dog first aid as well as put together a canine first-aid kit. The big question I have is, what to do if the dog has a serious injury that needs attention from a vet ASAP? From my understanding there are only 3 emergency animal hospitals in MN that are open all the time and they're all in the metro. A good chunk of pheasant country in MN is in the lighter populated areas of the state and God forbid if something life-threatening happens to your dog what do you do?
 

Flush em up

New member
This has crossed my mind, and god forbid it ever happens. I am curious too. My thought call the local vet in the area and cross my fingers. I think there is an emergency number sometimes.

One event sticks out in my mind. My dog and I were walking around a pond and came across a dried ditch a beaver had been using years ago. There were dager looking branches everywhere. My dog jumped across before I had seen this and I thank got she missed all the danger branches. It reminded me of the movie The Edge with Anthony Hopkins having the bears weight stab itself with the branch spear. Scary stuff when it's you dog this almost happening too.
 

Dakotazeb

Active member
Plan ahead and keep a list of local vets (and their phone numbers) in the area you are going to hunt. I think almost all vets have an emergency number in case they are needed after normal clinic hours.
 

BRITTMAN

Active member
Lot's of vets have moved or retired and their numbers still appear live on the net. The list may best be verified by giving them a call.

Dog ripped her chest open on a barb wire fence and needed staples. First two vets were no longer in business. We called a vet in a larger town and made the 35 minute drive.
 

waterdog09

Member
We had a situation like this years ago and the vet was closed but had a emergency # that we called and they met us at the vet and took care of the dog. Do your research for the area you will be hunting in, most rural areas have a vet that might be on call because they deal with a lot of farm animals and things like that.
 
I've got a dog first aid kit that I bought in 2012 when I first got my lab. That said, I don't know if I have opened it since then and I'm not sure I would know what to do if I needed to use something in it. I've been telling myself for years that I need to look into it a bit.... I have opened it to put some antibacterial ointment or gauze around legs a few times when there's a small cut from barbed wire, but that's it.

Researching a list of vets in the area you plan to hunt would be a good start, and verifying their emergency numbers or that they are still active. Like other posts have mentioned, most have an emergency # that their recording will give you if you call after hours. It is also wise to carry an updated vaccination record or whatever medical info you have on your dog with you, never know what may happen and what that new emergency vet may need to know or have proof of.

One of my 2 SD trips with groups has a vet that hunts with us, so I am at least covered for my longest hunting trip of the year in case of a field emergency. But that only makes up a small percentage of my overall hunting each year.
 
My dog was badly cut on the left foreleg while hunting today in NW Iowa (opening day).

A couple of us had first aid kits.

I applied antiseptic cream. Placed a gauze and wrapped the leg with "vet wrap".

A conservation officer was present at the time. Using his cell phone (mine did not have a good signal), I called a veterinarian in a town about 25 miles away. I got my dog there and they cleaned, stitched, and stapled the wound.

I need to heed the advice of this thread and get the numbers of local veterinarians.

With out the CO's local knowledge, I would have been scrambling.
 
Weekday hunting is during the day hours at this time of the year. There is always a veterinarian within 30 miles of most MN hunting areas during the day. Knowing where the nearest hospital is basic health information. Most towns that have a hospital have a veterinarian. I would think most people woud be aware of basic first aid? If not... put pressure over bleeding...
 
What's this suppose to mean? I suppose when the dog is dead the bleeding will stop.
Just a joke that someone once told me.

My dog's injury was not bleeding.

I carry a military combat bandage with "quick clot". I have, fortunately, never had to use it.

It is designed to stop any bleeding.
 
Weekday hunting is during the day hours at this time of the year. There is always a veterinarian within 30 miles of most MN hunting areas during the day. Knowing where the nearest hospital is basic health information. Most towns that have a hospital have a veterinarian. I would think most people woud be aware of basic first aid? If not... put pressure over bleeding...
I was posing the question not to deal with "most" situations. Trying my best to be prepared in the event that a freak accident happens miles from civilization, or God forbid on a weekend when the vet is closed. If you only hunt on the weekdays on a field within 10 minutes of a vets office that's great for you.
 

JMc

Super Moderator
Have a good kit with you at all times. DON'T leave it in the truck. I carry mine in my vest. Here's my boy Jax after a mishap with a barbed wired fence. Cleaned with saline solution (contact lens solution works best) and a few staples and he's was good to go.
View attachment 9470
 

Labs

Member
I highly recommend you carry a couple tubes of EMT Gel, 4x4 gauze pads, and a roll or two of vet wrap. The EMT Gel will stop bleeding, even a bad cut, the pads and vet wrap will secure the wound and further assist to control bleeding. I carry alcohol to pour on the belly of an overheated dog ( helps cool them) and as I'm in snake country, Benadryl which helps lessen throat swelling which will kill your dog quicker than the venom. Also always carry a small Gerber multi-tool called a Dime, perfect for pulling quills ( used it for that in Harley last weekend's hunt) and slivers/thorns out of your dog and yourself...
 
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