Habitat stamp Required

hunter94

Active member
as one member said......."we are trying to run a business here."
trust, but verify.....show me what my money will buy......using the money to build another boat launch would just piss me off.
 

5 stand

Member
If I remember what I read correctly.
If you buy a combination license hunting/ fishing the habitat stamp money is divided between hunting and fishing.
If you buy fishing license only the habitat stamp goes towards fishing.
If you buy hunting license only the habitat stamp goes towards hunting.
 

5 stand

Member
Where does the money go? How will the money from the habitat stamp benefit South Dakota? Habitat stamp funds associated with hunting and furbearer license sales will fund wildlife habitat developments and public access improvements on public lands across South Dakota. Projects will include things like establishing nesting and brood-rearing cover, tree and shrub plantings, food plots, and hunting access trails. Habitat stamp funds will also be used to provide public hunting access to private lands that offer quality hunting opportunities. Habitat stamp funds associated with fishing license sales will fund aquatic habitat projects on public waters across South Dakota, as well as projects that create or enhance public access to those waters. Dam maintenance, repairs and replacements will be conducted on aging structures around the state. Boat docks, roads and vault toilets may be added or improved to create more opportunities for users. Small-scale projects may include dredging, aeration, shoreline restoration, stream restoration, artificial and natural habitat structure placements, and outlet structure repair and maintenance. Large-scale projects may include whole-lake restorations, river/stream restorations, watershed improvements, sediment removal and controls, chemical renovations of the fish populations, riparian buffer zone creations, and habitat diversifications. How will money from resident combination licenses be split between land projects and water projects? If both a hunting and fishing or a combination (resident) license is purchased, the fee will be split equally between terrestrial enhancements and aquatic enhancements.
 

fourtrax

Member
STAMP? Pizz poor timing. Many folks laid off. I MAY still come there. This alone won't be a deal breaker but if any other "things" show up to get in the way of my coming there It's the "bird finger!" Just hard to swallow as the hunting has gone down hill for so long. Time will tell. It's the idea more than the amount I guess.
 

Chip

Member
My group of 14 (including the kids) are commited to our annual trip to Sd. All of you resident hunters will be proud to learn that after 25 consecutive years of our family trip this will be our last. When you add the cost of a license and the $25 whatever stamp brings it to $154. The trespass fee are going up as well. My group can fly to Texas on a great duck hunt for less money. South Dakota cost for a 3 day hunt is crazy for the the average working man. We won't stop our annual family hunting trip just not in SD
 

labrador

New member
The conversation could easily drift away from habitat preservation/creation and access at this point. However, it is important to discuss that states should prioritize opportunity for residents. It should be expensive for non residents to pursue recreation in states other than where they maintain primary residence. South Dakota residents are giving up hunting and their children are exposed to less of the sport we all love. This is due to the fact that the hunting is a fraction of what it was 10 - 15 years ago. When I hunt in another state I expect it to be expensive. Non residents should be expected to take a hit to hunt here. SD is still the best pheasant state and I don't see that changing. The fact of the matter is though if we don't come up with ways to get more grass on the ground in large blocks, we won't have a huntable population in the future.
 
Resident or non-resident, the issue comes down to time scouting...residents presumably have the time and opportunity to do more scouting more easily, establish relationships more easily, etc; guys coming from out of state may find that harder to accomplish, so forking over the $ to access land makes some sense, at least early in the hunters career hunting in a far away state. Where I've been hunting, my 28th season coming up, hunters from the nearby "bigger towns" have poor reputations, on average, with the farmers that I know....and I know many farmers. Again, not all of the hunters who come out of cities 20, 30, or 90 miles away have committed the transgressions that the local farmers suspect, but perception is reality in many cases. I'm OK paying more than residents for licenses...no issue there. everything else is just a choice...preseason scouting is a choice...forging relationships with farmers is a choice...reinforcing those relationships is a choice...it all comes down to how important the hunting is to you, whether you live 20 miles away or 450 miles away.

Personally, I enjoy the spring and summer trips out there a lot...just got a call today from a farmer inviting me to his daughters grad party in July...he told me about a young farmer who I know well who had his 1 year old lab disappear a week or so ago...so I called him to offer condolences and check on that situation...while talking to him, he asked if I would make pulled pork for his grooms dinner in August, he knew I was coming to his wedding...I smoked some pork shoulder in May when I was out there and invited a few farm families for supper one night, and told them I would love to cook for any grad parties, weddings, bull sales, etc, if they were interested...I love that stuff! I was elated that this young man asked...I guess they liked my pulled pork! He has already been very hospitable with his land, as has his dad, and his granddad, too. All close in proximity to where I stay, and we have an "open kitchen" during the hunting season...my buddies and I love to cook and host our local farmer friends...frankly, it is as fun as the hunting. I try and make it to all the grad parties, weddings, funerals, etc, that I can attend...usually about 3 per year on average over the past 20 years. This takes time, no doubt, and not every NR hunter can do these things, but it comes down to priorities. The further you travel, the more serious the local farmers realize you are about the hunting, the friendships, etc. Many of them have traveled to my city to visit, too...all in all, fun stuff, and on average, those friendships mean more to me than about any I have.
 
over the years of hosting hunters out there, I have had quite a few show an interest in the local farmers...their operations, their equipment, their animals, their children...some of these hunters have offered to help out with actual farm work...I have friends who know how to do "stuff"! I don't know how to do stuff, I am helpless, but I am willing to try! Some of the work is just about the labor...the manpower...and we have been blessed with good hunting, and don't need to hunt til dark. It is really cool to have hunting buddies who have skills that the farmers respect and can benefit from...quite a few guys who hunt with me work on railroads as machinists, and have some ability. One guy runs a shop that makes elaborate logging equipment, and he knows a lot about heavy equipment...some of my hunters are doctors, and the local farmers routinely pick their brains about medical issues that they, or family members, are presenting (dozens of times, frankly). My occupation has come in handy, several of the locals call me periodically for advice about financial issues...I offer advice, no actual business development. One had me join he and his wife two falls ago and go visit with the wifes HR dept and discuss her retirement account from where she used to work. If nothing else, all people tend to be very willing and happy to share with others who are sincerely interested and curious about what they do, how they make a living, what their kids are up to, etc. By showing some interest, and investing some time, these relationships blossom very quickly. If nothing else, attending a football game, a volleyball game, a basketball game of a farmers son or daughter is a lot of fun...you don't have to be in a bar to meet the locals...not that there's anything wrong with that, just saying...as I sip on some Birddog peach whiskey...:giggle:
 

hunter94

Active member
so saying this is a habitat stamp is disingenuous at best! reading the fine print tells me all i need to know.
there is little incentive for me to ante up another $25 so they can balance the budget on my back.....if they happen to lease a quarter of grass, that's a perk, lol.

balancing the budget will take precedence this year, that's why they want you to buy a license early. doubtful there will be any significant habitat improvements this fall. i guess we will wait and see if they make any announcements. Hope i am wrong.
 

sjohn

Member
BB. You are spot on with your assessment and my situation is almost identical but I drive 1300 miles one way every year to enjoy the friendships and experiences of hunting SD roosters. I grew up in PA and if I saw a dozen birds a year it was a good year. We stay with a family that we have over 30 years relations with, share in the cooking and invite our hosts extended families for dinners several nights during the week. These are true friends that open their doors and their land for just the respect we have given them through the years. And many have made the 1300 mile trek back to SC to visit us and experience some of our sporting activities such as summer striper fishing and likes of Charleston our out ocean front communities. I was just talking to my buddy yesterday and asked if he thought there would be any issues coming this fall because of the corona virus. All he said was "My door will be open." I then asked him about his mothers door as we stay in two farm houses, he said, "Her door will be open too". If that doesn't speak load and clear what life is all about, I don't know what does. A 25$ habitat fee or whatever fee, I don't care. With everything included the habitat fee only increases the cost of my trip by 2.5% Seeing my friends, relaxing after hunting and in the evenings, and just getting away from my normal stuff is worth every penny. See you all this winter as I am coming short of death.
 

goldenboy

Active member
My group of 14 (including the kids) are commited to our annual trip to Sd. All of you resident hunters will be proud to learn that after 25 consecutive years of our family trip this will be our last. When you add the cost of a license and the $25 whatever stamp brings it to $154. The trespass fee are going up as well. My group can fly to Texas on a great duck hunt for less money. South Dakota cost for a 3 day hunt is crazy for the the average working man. We won't stop our annual family hunting trip just not in SD
Chip, That statement says a lot! We all love the time spent with family and buddies, but in the end if I don't see any birds to shoot, I am going somehwere else. i don't have to kill a limit everyday, but I want to see birds when I am hunting and not just behind no trespassing signs.
 

dakotasj

Member
Liked what bb and sjohn said.

I guess I'm getting old. Actually its not a guess - I am old (70), so my perspective is somewhat different than some and thankfully similar to some. I've hunted other states for upland, but none have ever compared to SD. Nowhere else have I consistently seen the number of pheasants in range, plus the possibility of getting huns, sharptails and prairie chickens.

This year will be my 24th straight in SD, God willing.

My drive is only 1100 miles one way and we go at least twice sometimes 3 times a year. I've raised Brittanys for upland hunting for 40 years.

Is it about the dogs -yes.

Is it about pheasants - yes.

Is it about the people I've met in SD - absolutely.

Its also about planning the trip, packing and repacking gear. Its also the familiarity of the drive, the place we stay, restaurants, Cabela's in Mitchell, worn out hunting clothes and new additions.

Its also good for the soul to be shaking hands again with farmers that have for decades allowed me to stay in their homes, share their food and land.

Bought a new pair of hunting boots for the first time in 5 years - hope I get to wear them this year, last year it was Mucks most often until January. Really hoping I can wear them out in about 5 more years in SD.

I didn't like SD stopping the road survey, always anxiously looked forward to reading it; however, it never made any difference about whether I was going or where I was going. It just gets the blood pumping a little bit more, kind of like the preseason college football polls.

$25 Habitat Stamp? Its bug dust compared to dog food, vet bills, gas, shells, guns, boots, gas, truck, collars, launchers, quail, kennels, trips to local hunting preserve, etc.

So I'll go as long as the legs and back hold up and dogs agree to go.

Do I like to get my limit each day? Yes. But - its ok if we need 2 for a party limit and we are still hunting in the golden hour. Yeah. I'm ok with that. Its been an awesome day.

$25? ( Maybe I should be hoping that keeps lots of NRs away).
 
for me, it's not the $25; I buy 4 licenses in SD annually...over $500. It's a bit disingenuous the way GFP is going about their "business"...and I wish they weren't approaching this as business. If your coffers are not full enough, just say it. Raise prices on the license if you have to. Calling it a "habitat stamp" is fine, but they're invoking the most sacred of things to a pheasant hunter--habitat--which they may assume will minimize the opposition. Terminating the brood survey at the same time you're preaching about the importance of habitat aren't necessarily opposing philosophies, but kinda...the brood survey kinda confirms what the habitat produces...dropping the survey suggests they may fear what it would uncover...fewer birds, perhaps? That survey, in good years, was the best 700k they could spend from a marketing perspective. Bottom line, I get enough BS from corporate america, trying to trick me, trying to sell me, trying to get me to part with my $. I don't want to have to question what GFP tells me the way I may scrutinize what my bank is telling me, my phone provider is telling me, what my health insurer or car insurer is telling me...I expect every company I deal with to try and confuse/obfuscate, in order to get into my wallet...I would like the wildlife biologists not have to team up with MBA's when they write their reports!!!! :LOL:
 

3car

Member
My experience with quality habitat is that it takes time and money to develop. We have been farming and spraying thousands of acres and now our last WPA is seeded back in that Eureka area. We started that project in 2010. Expecting differences in habitat this fall is a little early. Give them time. Those folks on the ground are genuine people and have the public's best interests in place. The survey is kinda a bummer and I hated to see that as well. All of those years of surveys kinda shot now.

I have been working with many landowners these last few years that are planting crop back to grasslands. Not just a few acres here and there but thousands of acres. I am guessing these acres were broke when corn hit 8 dollars and are seeing that these areas were never meant to be farmed. Converting some crop to grass is a good start.
 

hunter94

Active member
for me, it's not the $25; I buy 4 licenses in SD annually...over $500. It's a bit disingenuous the way GFP is going about their "business"...and I wish they weren't approaching this as business. If your coffers are not full enough, just say it. Raise prices on the license if you have to. Calling it a "habitat stamp" is fine, but they're invoking the most sacred of things to a pheasant hunter--habitat--which they may assume will minimize the opposition. Terminating the brood survey at the same time you're preaching about the importance of habitat aren't necessarily opposing philosophies, but kinda...the brood survey kinda confirms what the habitat produces...dropping the survey suggests they may fear what it would uncover...fewer birds, perhaps? That survey, in good years, was the best 700k they could spend from a marketing perspective. Bottom line, I get enough BS from corporate america, trying to trick me, trying to sell me, trying to get me to part with my $. I don't want to have to question what GFP tells me the way I may scrutinize what my bank is telling me, my phone provider is telling me, what my health insurer or car insurer is telling me...I expect every company I deal with to try and confuse/obfuscate, in order to get into my wallet...I would like the wildlife biologists not have to team up with MBA's when they write their reports!!!! :LOL:
it seems to be a game of deception to extract more money for a budget shortfall. no details leaves the program wide open for abuse.
plus the stamp is another opportunity for them to raise fees in the future......it just smells bad.
 
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