Bird/ condition reports

bird-bandit

New member
I was wondering if anyone out in North Dakota can give a condition report. I believe the conditions have been better so far the spring. The chicks should be hatching any day now wondering if anyone has been seeing any and how the drought recovery is coming. I'm also particularly wondering about the bowman area because that's where I hunt. According to the farmer out there that I talk to you he said conditions on his place are better this year
 

gjw

Member
Hi, well I can say that this year we've been getting a lot more rain and things are really green. The crops are coming up nicely and the prairie grasses are also growing. We've been getting rain here every week so far. It's been a big help. As far as the birds go, we did have a fair winter, cold, but not a lot of snow, a bit below average. The birds made it thru okay, saw quite a few this (short) spring when they were pairing up. The down side is, on average it was one hen to one rooster. Did see a couple roosters with two hens. I think the weather has been very good for nesting and the cover is coming up for the broods. I just hope the weather holds. This is my take for the central part of the state (south a bit north of Bismarck). Can't really say much about the western part of the state, except the conditions are better than last year as your farmer friend told you. Overall, I think we'll have a better year than last, but not like a few years ago. That takes time and Gods good will.

Best,

Greg
 

gjw

Member
Hi, like b-b said, they've gotten a more rain this year than last, the area your asking about is either normal or abnormally dry. So conditions are much more favorable for nesting and we hope the brooding season. As to the hatch, still a bit early to tell. Haven't heard anything either way. We'll see what Game & Fish has to say in the coming weeks. Fingers crossed for continued good weather!

Best,

Greg
 

James O

Member
Thanks guys
Can not wait for season to start.Looking forward to a better season
Than last year.Went to kansas last year I missed N Dakota
 

bird-bandit

New member
I recently figured out that my weather app on my phone has access to a live camera just south of Bowman on 85 everything on the screen looks green and Lush and long as far as the grass obviously that's only part of the battle
 

benelli-banger

Active member
today...down 30% statewide, with ranges of 15% to 38% (down) depending on the area...however, it said conditions have been quite good for nesting, and it is very possible that there will be a good hatch, which will help in the rebuilding process getting back to pre-drought levels...it blamed the drought for the decrease in crowing birds...
 

James O

Member
I think the nesting is more important.Looking forward to roadside
Report in sept.I am coming no matter what.
There will be habitat to hunt.That is why I did not come last year
Because of drought effect on habitat not pheasant numbers.
A perfect day for me would be my dogs put up 5 roosters in 6 hours
That are within a shootable range
 

JO BO

Member
Was at my farm south of bowman today
Grass up to the hood on my pickup best in years
Lots of sweetclover
If there is a good hatch from what birds that
Made it this winter they have the cover and bugs they need
Only problem is early haying
 

Lazy Ike

Member
Spring Pheasant Count Down from Last Year
Mon, 06/25/2018
North Dakota’s spring pheasant population index is down 30 percent from the same time last year, according to the state Game and Fish Department’s 2018 spring crowing count survey.

R.J. Gross, upland game management biologist, said the number of roosters heard crowing this spring was down statewide, with decreases ranging from 15 to 38 percent in the primary regions holding pheasants.

“We entered spring with a lower than average number of adult birds,” Gross said. “Last year’s production was far below average due to the statewide drought conditions.”

However, Gross said the past winter was good for bird survival, so hens should be in good physical shape for the nesting season.

“In addition, this spring’s weather has been good so far, as most of the state has received adequate rainfall,” he added. “If the trend continues, a good hatch should be expected, but it will take a few years of good reproduction to get the population back to where it was before the drought.”

While the spring number is an indicator, Gross said it does not predict what the fall population will look like. Brood surveys, which begin in late July and are completed by September, provide a much better estimate of summer pheasant production and what hunters might expect for a fall pheasant population.

Pheasant crowing counts are conducted each spring throughout North Dakota. Observers drive specified 20-mile routes, stopping at predetermined intervals, and counting the number of pheasant roosters heard crowing over a two-minute period during the stop.

The number of pheasant crows heard is compared to previous years’ data, providing a trend summary
.


I can't find it anywhere but the report on the TV news last night said that last season the young of the year bird to old bird ratio was about 1:1 It is normally 3 or 4:1
 

goldenboy

Active member
Here is a report I just read.

Spring Pheasant Count Down 15-38% from Last Year

North Dakota’s spring pheasant population index is down 30 percent from the same time last year, according to the state Game and Fish Department’s 2018 spring crowing count survey.

R.J. Gross, upland game management biologist, said the number of roosters heard crowing this spring was down statewide, with decreases ranging from 15 to 38 percent in the primary regions holding pheasants.

“We entered spring with a lower than average number of adult birds,” Gross said. “Last year’s production was far below average due to the statewide drought conditions.”

However, Gross said the past winter was good for bird survival, so hens should be in good physical shape for the nesting season.

“In addition, this spring’s weather has been good so far, as most of the state has received adequate rainfall,” he added. “If the trend continues, a good hatch should be expected, but it will take a few years of good reproduction to get the population back to where it was before the drought.”

While the spring number is an indicator, Gross said it does not predict what the fall population will look like. Brood surveys, which begin in late July and are completed by September, provide a much better estimate of summer pheasant production and what hunters might expect for a fall pheasant population.

Pheasant crowing counts are conducted each spring throughout North Dakota. Observers drive specified 20-mile routes, stopping at predetermined intervals, and counting the number of pheasant roosters heard crowing over a two-minute period during the stop.

The number of pheasant crows heard is compared to previous years’ data, providing a trend summary.

Area Update: Pheasant numbers appear to be better than last year in north central North Dakota. Regular rains have provided a good start to crop, hay and pasture areas, resulting in solid insect hatches -- which were missing in 2017 due to drought. Sharptail grouse and huns should also benefit from these conditions.
 
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