Best breed for finding cripples

A5 Sweet 16

Well-known member
So marking?
In that case, Walt didn't see it fall (to use the term loosely) & didn't use magic. By the time I got him to the drop site, the bird was long gone & there was no cover anywhere for a bird to leave scent on. How the bird managed to run all that way on packed snow without us seeing him is a mystery. He did it though. But Walt got him.
 

Gatzby

Member
BINGO!!!....we have a winner.
Assuming your premise is correct that the nose is the only tool necessary for game recovery. We have a very clear answer.
According to multiple websites the top 3 dog breeds used by military, and lawn enforcement for detection work. (S&R, drugs, bomb etc)
English Springer Spanial
Labrador Retreiver
Golden Retriever
Beagles, Bloodhounds, ranked higher but I excluded them as most wouldn’t hunt upland with them.
 

Hunting RN

Member
You wanna equate finding a bomb or drugs under the back seat of a car, to finding wild birds in the wide wild open spaces?...:unsure:....you go right ahead. ;)......Muffy ,Floppsy, and Spot, from the pound can do the same thing. :rolleyes:
 
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carptom1

Active member
I co
OK, while I prefer to think my dog is using physics calculations to get himself to the drop area of a bird he really didn't see fall....does anyone think they might be using their noses?? I mean, I see my dogs do this many times a year. It seems unlikely to me that a springer buried in cattails or tall CRP grass is using his nose to direct himself to a very dead bird that fell 25 yards away with wind blowing away from him. If not, then it's physics or magic.
But seriously
If the dog cannot get to the area of the fall for what ever reason. I.E. a fence he cannot get through, a river he's afraid to swim, or he has no idea where it fell. Then you the hunter (assuming you marked the fall) will assist the dog to the area of the fall and instigate a hunt where the dog will use the other tool (his nose).
Gatzby,

this sounds awfully familiar from past discussions with other versatile blood trailing threads. I thought we d
Assuming your premise is correct that the nose is the only tool necessary for game recovery. We have a very clear answer.
According to multiple websites the top 3 dog breeds used by military, and lawn enforcement for detection work. (S&R, drugs, bomb etc)
English Springer Spanial
Labrador Retreiver
Golden Retriever
Beagles, Bloodhounds, ranked higher but I excluded them as most wouldn’t hunt upland with them.
Gatzby,

You must really be bored to be revisiting this V dog / 🩸Trailing issue again. I thought we put this to bed a couple years ago in here. Just agree as I have to bumbling through the fields ( collecting everyone’s birds btw) with our non trailing, no smelling labs that don’t have a clue and are lucky to find anything. At least we will know who to call if we shoot an elephant that leaves a well marked trail :)

On a side note, my old male is the best marker I have ever witnessed in a gun dog. I have seen too many birds shot by others and picked up by him in waist high sorghum or grass to think otherwise. He immediately goes to the sky upon a shot. He obviously had good drive and instinct, but I believe it was hours of training in the grass by my home that brought it out. While I agree a nose is important, I don’t know how anyone could say accurate marking was not a part of good retrieving. Honestly many times by the time I would have the gun down he would be there. There are a few on here that have hunted with him that would attest to that. It is a shame that he is now past his prime and his skills have diminished. He definitely had shortcomings as a bird dog, retrieving birds was not one of them
 
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Gatzby

Member
I co


Gatzby,

this sounds awfully familiar from past discussions with other versatile blood trailing threads. I thought we d

Gatzby,

You must really be bored to be revisiting this V dog / 🩸Trailing issue again. I thought we put this to bed a couple years ago in here. Just agree, as I have, to bumbling through the fields ( collecting everyone’s birds btw) with our non trailing, no smelling labs that don’t have a clue and are lucky to find anything. At least we will know who to call if we shoot an elephant that leaves a well marked trail :)

On a side note, my old male is the best marker I have ever witnessed in a gun dog. I have seen too many birds shot by others and picked up by him in waist high sorghum or grass to think otherwise. He immediately goes to the sky upon a shot. He obviously had good drive and instinct, but I believe it was hours of training in the grass by my home that brought it out. While I agree a nose is important, I don’t know how anyone could say accurate marking was not a part of good retrieving. Honestly many times by the time I would have the gun down he would be there. There are a few on here that have hunted with him that would attest to that. It is a shame that he is now past his prime and his skills have diminished. He definitely had shortcomings as a bird dog, retrieving birds was not one of them
Carptom
I hope life is treating you well!
You are correct I am bored!
I probably would have quit tormenting the the V dog blood trailers along time ago but they make it sooo dang easy. The funny part is I have a 4 dogs one of which is a Wirehair! (That hair ball is a nice dog).
It’s hilarious the only argument they have is “it’s better than a Lab” unfortunately they never back it up with facts.
 

Olden Cranky

New member
I'll go with two of my former dogs, Buck an American Water Spaniel and Star a Chesapeake. Buck's nose was amazing. I recall him making several unbelievable retrieves on ducks; one a sailor that went into a large greenbelt and considered lost. A good hour after the first try by the hunter; I took Buck into the trees where he promptly hunted dead; raised his head and pointed to the dead greenhead in the fork of tree, six feet off the ground. On a different hunt, he also dove into a snowbank to bring me my Super Black Eagle's bolt tang that I had lost hours before. I recall Star disappearing into a riparian cattail marsh for over 20 minutes only to emerge with the rooster that I considered lost.
 
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