A few Pheasants from around the world

1pheas4

Super Moderator
I believe these pheasants are Phasianus colchicus torquatus/"Chinese" pheasant. Someone correct me if I'm wrong please.:)

Note; this site tends to be there one day and gone the next. If the link doesn't work give it a day or two and try again. Sorry.

http://www.birdnet.cn/thread-535813-1-1.html

Nick
 
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1pheas4

Super Moderator
In the first two links, take note how the first rooster uses a dirt mount to make his voice heard. A boulder or the top of a weedy hill (second link) will allow them to do the same. (They serve as territory markers). Territory markers can increase the amount of breeding roosters within an area of habitat.

http://www.birdnet.cn/thread-647200-1-1.html


Nice close up "cackling" photos--Torquatus

http://www.birdnet.cn/thread-646534-1-1.html


This link has some very good(!) flying photos of wild Formosa pheasants! (last photo may be a pen raised bird/mixed??)

http://www.birdnet.cn/thread-476018-1-1.html


This bird looks like strauchi but may be mixed:confused: Preston1 can you tell what he is by chance?

Anyway, check out the last two photos. lol
http://www.birdnet.cn/thread-513852-1-1.html
 
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Preston1

Member
Great Great wild pheasants photos 1pheas4. That roaster on your last link is a Strauchi or Sichuan pheasant. But according to Jean Delacour (The pheasants of the World) and James Pfarr ( True Pheasants a Noble Quarry) the Strauchi and the Sungpan pheasant (P. c. satschanensis) as well as the regular ringneck (P. c. torquatus) intergrate naturally when their ranges geographically meet or overlap, which they do in south central China.

There are 17 subspecies of True Pheasant "The Gray-rumped Group" of that group most have a full ring. But 5 of the 17 out of that group of gray-rumped "ringneck" pheasants are ringless or only show a speck of a ring that includes the Strauchi.

One interesting note about these "ringless" ringneck pheasants from south central China, is that they are wary and alert. In addition to that they range as far south as latitude 25 north, that is warm, hot and humid country.

That would be equal or close to in North America to Brownsvile, Texas or Miami, Florida. The Formosa ringnecks are also near or just south of that latitude.
Whoever came up with the theory the wild pheasants can't reproduce in warm hot or humid climates never made a visit to China.

The mallard duck naturally came over from China around 5 to 10 thousand years ago (thats what the experts say) and now thousand fly over naturally from Asia and Siberia every year.

Main point, if we want to maintain a continuous agile, wary, alert and wild gene pool of pheasants in North America, we will have to periodically reintroduce authentic wild genes from abroad.
 
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UplandLevi

New member
Main point, if we want to maintain a continuous agile, wary, alert and wild gene pool of pheasants in North America, we will have to periodically reintroduce authentic wild genes from abroad.
I like that idea. That would definitely be really cool if organizations, such as Pheasants Forever or one like it, would do that. Also, do you think would it be possible to introduce other pheasant species/subspecies of pheasants to North America?
 

Preston1

Member
I like that idea. That would definitely be really cool if organizations, such as Pheasants Forever or one like it, would do that. Also, do you think would it be possible to introduce other pheasant species/subspecies of pheasants to North America?
Wild pheasants are alive and well in the Boothheel of Missouri, the state stocked that area with F1 Korean ringneck pheasants (P. c. karpowi) 40 years ago, the brood stock of these pen raised pheasants were only one generation removed from the authentic wild fields. See link below:

http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.23...2&uid=70&uid=4&uid=3739256&sid=21102809849673

Those Korean ringneck are basically identical to any wild ringneck.

If wild pheasants can survive in that area they should survive in south Illinois and southeast Kansas.

Macfarlane pheasant farm and Wisconsin Dept. of Ag. imported authentic wild eggs from the wild fields, the Manchurian pheasant (P. c.pallasi) from China. See link:


http://www.pheasant.com/aboutus/successstories/puremanchuriansfromchina.aspx

Strauchi or Sichuan story below:
http://ww2.dnr.state.mi.us/publicat...abitat/Reports/WLD-library/3200-3299/3271.pdf

Michigan, Oregon, North Dakota and Pa. all released the Strauchi or Sichuan pheasant and they naturally crossed the the regular ringneck pheasants in the area to produce an alert and wary thin ringed rooster (hens look alike) in the areas. The Strauchi pheasants will do the same thing naturally in China when the range of the two subspecies meet.

New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri years ago brought in the White-Winged pheasant (P. c. Bianchi) wild alert and wary of predators 40 years ago. This pheasant crossed with the regular ringneck (hens look alike) to produce a wild and alert ringneck in the areas. see photo:
http://www.pbase.com/silverbowff/image/38925285
 
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oldandnew

New member
Wild pheasants are alive and well in the Boothheel of Missouri, the state stocked that area with F1 Korean ringneck pheasants (P. c. karpowi) 40 years ago, the brood stock of these pen raised pheasants were only one generation removed from the authentic wild fields. See link below:

http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.23...2&uid=70&uid=4&uid=3739256&sid=21102809849673

Those Korean ringneck are basically identical to any wild ringneck.

If wild pheasants can survive in that area they should survive in south Illinois and southeast Kansas.

Macfarlane pheasant farm and Wisconsin Dept. of Ag. imported authentic wild eggs from the wild fields, the Manchurian pheasant (P. c.pallasi) from China. See link:

http://www.pheasant.com/about-us/success-stories/pure-manchurians-from-china

The Strauchi or Sichuan story below:
http://ww2.dnr.state.mi.us/publicat...abitat/Reports/WLD-library/3200-3299/3271.pdf

Michigan, Oregon, North Dakota and Pa. all released the Strauchi or Sichuan pheasant and they naturally crossed the the regular ringneck pheasants in the area to produce an alert and wary thin ringed rooster (hens look alike) in the areas. The Strauchi pheasants will do the same thing naturally in China when the range of the two subspecies meet.

New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri years ago brought in the White-Winged pheasant (P. c. Bianchi) wild alert and wary of predators 40 years ago. This pheasant crossed with the regular ringneck (hens look alike) to produce a wild and alert ringneck in the areas. see photo:
http://www.pbase.com/silverbowff/image/38925285
Habitat is the limiting factor in southeast Mo. But they are bringing back quail there. Some areas it's amazing that any bird but a sparrow could live. But pheasants do, even have 12 day hunting season, with no subsequent reintroduction since the first few years, since ignored by the Missouri Conservation Department. They are trying the same program with the Ruffed Grouse currently. These pheasants survive in rice fields and cotton fields to brood and hatch! You might have to hunt for the rest of your life to bag one! I get a kick that their there at all! If Missouri could house sustainable populations of ruffed grouse, pheasants in the north 1/3rd of the state, and the bootheel, rebuild our quail to the million harvest mark, (let alone the 2-4 million mark of the 1955-1975.) This would be Valhalla! They used to call them "Korean" pheasants, I do know that they roost in trees, which helps with the ground prowling predator thing.
 
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Preston1

Member
Does anyone know what the largest species of pheasant is? (largest in weight)
I think the longest is Reeve's, right?
All of the photos and discussions on this thread are about the True Pheasant also called the Common Pheasant ringneck type (hunting pheasant) and their many subspecies.

The pheasant that you are asking about is a classified as The Long-Tailed Pheasant larger than the True Pheasant. In addition to the Reese's pheasant that class also includes the Mikado Pheasant and the Burmese Bar-tailed Pheasant. This group is native to China. They are frequently seen in zoos. They never took root in the wild in North America or Europe like the True Pheasants.

The pheasant families around the world includes a vast variety wild "chicken-like" birds, look at the link below:
http://creagrus.home.montereybay.com/pheasants.html

In terms of size and weight the wild Peacock and the wild Turkey should be your largest pheasants. If you are looking at the Phasianidae Family.
 
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1pheas4

Super Moderator
Strauchi crowing photo
http://www.youboy.com/pics46177689.html


Rothschild rooster photo
http://image.cn.made-in-china.com/2f0j01wvoabiyErzcO/野鸡/野鸡苗.jpg

A couple tough Strauchi roosters!:thumbsup:
http://www.swild.cn/bbs/viewthread.php?tid=326

Stones (?) pheasants in a pen (china)
http://image6.huangye88.com/2013/05/17/552ae06308146a53.jpg

Wild Bianchi "afghan white wing" rooster in the first picture, then Kirghiz "Mongolian" pheasant photos
http://www.xj616.cn/showpiclist.asp?id=158

Here's a couple more photos of wild Bianchi's in what I'm guessing is somewhere near/around Afghanistan??
http://bbs.xjks.net/thread-175451-1-1.html
 
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1pheas4

Super Moderator
Wisturkeyhunter, the birds showing in your picture look similar to the birds WDNR release on public lands. They're a "Chinese"--Manchurian
cross breed. They tend to be lighter (yellowish) compared to most wild ring-neck pheasants located within southern Wisconsin. Your wild birds for the most part tend to be a darker/orange/reddish colored bird and with a skinner ring then the released birds that tend to carry a heaver/unbroken ring.

The birds in your photo may be released birds, or, if wild, could be directly related to the birds your state has been releasing.

As far as their blue backs go, many sub-species of true pheasants have the blueish colored backs you noticed on the Strauchi pheasants in the photos I posted. They're apart of what's called the "gray rump" group.

You'll notice the red "rump"/back on the Bianchi pheasnats in the other photos I posted. They're apart of the "white-wing" sub-species while the Mongolian is apart of the "kirghiz" group. All of which have had they're day leaving they're mark on Wisconsin wild pheasants, and to this day may very well be present in your wild birds today:).

Okay, is that enough "boring" for you.:) LOL
 

wisturkeyhunter

New member
Now you've gone and got me confused. :confused:

It's possible them are stocked birds but they had a natural looking nostril, and flew great after running several hundred yards. Plus they were in an area that has held birds even before the state started stocking there. Also was several hens around them that day.

These 2 were shot in the same area during a different season before the dnr had ever stocked the area and they also were pretty wild with no binder hole. Same color as the one I posted above. Thick ring and blue.


These 2 both had the enlarged nostril and lacked the blue plus had a.thinner ring.


Probably not much rhyme or reason to the colors at all once they have been in America mixing for many generations.
 
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1pheas4

Super Moderator
I'm deleting/editing this post. Things were going to get too confusing. I think I'll end up confusing all-the-more if I keep going. Sorry about that.


Nick
 
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Preston1

Member
Nick, you are not confusing anybody. Keep up the great work. No other big pheasant organization ( I won't name any names) gives out any great photos or genetic information on the True Pheasant subspecies or background information on the ringneck subspecies that make up our wild pheasant population like you do.

These wild pheasants are an important part of the north American hunting culture and heritage and they came here from other parts of this world, we need to be informed. No one else that I know of can find such stunning real wild photos of authentic wild True Pheasants in their native land, like you can, don't stop.
 

Preston1

Member
I love this Thread! Can you guys tell anything about the ancestry of these birds?

http://blog.pennlive.com/pa-sportsm...nklin_county_pennsylvania_includes_video.html
These pheasants on the video are probably an admixture of various subspecies of Chinese pheasants, I will explain.

Those wild pheasant from Montana can easily be 100 generations (100 years) of wild genes. Pheasants were first released in Montana in 1909. Back then all of the subspecies were simple referred to as Chinese Ring-Necked pheasants or simple as ringneck pheasants. But we now know that pheasant stock used 100 years ago out west and in the northern plains were made up of many subspecies, the Chinese ringneck, the Manchurian ringneck, the Mongolian ringneck (Kirghiz) the Korean ringneck and even a few Strauchi (Sichuan) pheasants.

The White-Winged pheasant (P. c. Bianchi) were not imported into America until the 1960's.

This is not always true, but the fact that the hen on the video has green eyes is a sign of many many generations of living in the real wild world, getting away from predators.

Most commercially available adult pen raised hen pheasants have dark eyes, a sign of many many generations of easy going pen life.
 
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