Stupid question about quail cover

vagrousehunter

New member
I grew up quail hunting in the Commonwealth of Virginia , hunting behind Setters with my dad. The quail pretty much disappeared 25 years ago so I became primarily a grouse hunter. Anyway, I've been out to the Midwest a few times in pursuit of pheasants but this year I'm going to try a late-season quail hunt in Oklahoma. I've already pinpointed the area that I want to hunt(Woodward) but I really am not sure what to look for in terms of types of cover. Things are a lot different out there than back East and I'd like to spend as much time as possible in productive covers. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
 
It can't be a stupid question, unless you already knew the answer;)

Best advice I've read on here, "hunt the edges". I never thought of it that way, but it makes sense when edges are available.

I've never hunted that part of OK, but just N in KS, old homesteads, pond dams, hedge rows, and open prairies are where I chase the quail birds. Also, they love beans and milo, so in the morning I prefer to hunt the edges of either of those crops.

My grandfather always told me to wait until "after lunch" to hunt them. He hunted cow pastures, never bothering with crop fields. I've found that when I'm in pastures, his advice is very useful. That said, I like to get crackin' first thing in the AM so I hunt near the feed until lunch, then head to the pastures.

Finally, if you show up before the sun comes up, park and sit quietly with the windows down and listen for coveys whistling. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.

Good luck!
 

JMichigan

New member
anything that has overhead cover and bare ground or really short vegetation for them to run through. So far this year that's been under tree/shrubs, milo fields, tumbleweed, and standing dead vegetation.
 

Prairie Drifter

Active member
If you can't see your feet, you are probably in too thick of cover. Look for a mixture of native grass, forbs, and brush. I'll forego naming species as you might not know them anyway. Edges are good, but don't let that keep you from hunting places you don't consider having an edge like pastures with thickets. Most grazed pastures with that mix will have good numbers of birds.
 

Prairie Drifter

Active member
Thanks akp. I do a lot of field days on quail management and it helps if you can give folks a measuring option that they can do without any tools or thought. The "a thicket a softball throw apart", analogy is another. I made some cardboard cones to help display the "cone of vulnerability" that a game bird is susceptible in from avian predators. We use a frisby to help instruct zone of fire in hunter's ed.

Maynard, that looks like a fine place to take a dog for his walk!
 

akp

Member
Get a copy of Dr. Fred Guthery's book On Bobwhites. Explains the needs of a bobwhite and much more. Hunted them my whole life but found his book so informative that I read it twice.
 

Prairie Drifter

Active member
akp, you're in the top 5%! Do you have a Stoddard or Rosene as well? How about Beef, Brush, and bobwhite? Great to hear! That's dedication!!!
 

akp

Member
Ha! No, haven't read that one but have seen it. I hunt a working cattle ranch so I see the benefit of proper grazing every time I let the dogs out.
 
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