Pheasant Renest

I always thought that if a hen Lost her WHOLE Brood at anytime she would renest. if the brood was 1,2,3 4, weeks old and the whole Brood was lost, she would Renest. If one chick remained she wouldn't, Only if all were Lost.

That being said I was on the SD site, and a few guys said that a Hen will only renest if the hen looses all the eggs (not Chicks). I understand that she will have fewer eggs and chicks every time she renests.

This site has taught me a lot. so my questions are:

Will the hen only renest if the all eggs are lost?
Will a hen renest if chicks are lost too?
if I am wrong (which I think I might be) did anyone else think this too?
 

UGUIDE

New member
This site has taught me a lot. so my questions are:

1. Will the hen only renest if the all eggs are lost?
2. Will a hen renest if chicks are lost too?
if I am wrong (which I think I might be) did anyone else think this too?

1. yes and up to as many as 3-4 times
2. A resource study in WI sites that "A hen will rarely renest if her whole brood is lost in the first few days after hatching". So yes but don't bet the pheasant farm on it.

Moral is that nature has a way and we still don't fully understand all that can happen in any given year. Invest in high quality habitat and that pays big dividends that cannot be measured.
 

Hockeybob

Active member
I always thought that if a hen Lost her WHOLE Brood at anytime she would renest. if the brood was 1,2,3 4, weeks old and the whole Brood was lost, she would Renest. If one chick remained she wouldn't, Only if all were Lost.

That being said I was on the SD site, and a few guys said that a Hen will only renest if the hen looses all the eggs (not Chicks). I understand that she will have fewer eggs and chicks every time she renests.

This site has taught me a lot. so my questions are:

Will the hen only renest if the all eggs are lost?
Will a hen renest if chicks are lost too?
if I am wrong (which I think I might be) did anyone else think this too?

Pheasanthunt,
The scary part about the drought stricken areas is this....
If the majority of hens had their chicks and after a week or so the chicks died because of the lack of moisture, lack of insects or what have you, that's it for that hen. She is incapable of renesting.
This is why I'm very pessimistic about my area in the NC part of the state.
My information I'm hearing from the people that live there is that bird numbers will be Way Down this year.
They are seeing very few chicks let alone pheasants.
I can't speak for other parts of the state. Good habitat or not. Nothing can help,chicks from starvation or die of thirst.
 
ty.


I think he have a decent amount of habitat, on our South Farm, we have 800 acres, 620 are planted. the other 180 is for the wildlife. Guys ask me to hay it every year. But I never let them.

Last year we shot 118 pheasants on this property. it felt like it was a good year. But I have never kept track before so have no idea, if it was above average or not. But I am glad I did keep track last year, so I will have something to compare this year too.

I was told that 85% of the birds you shoot are this year birds. Seems high, anyone else heard that? this might be a year we will put that to the test?


I do appreciate the info. I have learned a lot on this site. and met some good people.

ty
 

BigRand

Active member
Majority of your birds shot will be this year's birds. The problem with poor chick survival is that the average life of a pheasant is 1.5 years. So not having those young roosters to shoot this fall sucks but not having the hens from this year's hatch will really hurt the population rebounding next year.
 

westksbowhunter

Well-known member
http://iowapf.net/AYearInTheLife.aspx

If a hen hatches her first nest in early June, the chances of her and the chicks surviving next winter is 65-75%. If her first nest was destroyed, and she tries another nest (that hatches in early July), the chance she and the chicks survive next winter is 30-50%. If the second attempt failed and she tries successfully a third time, the chances are 0-10%.
 
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RONMN

Member
Talked to farmer friend in SD today. He is not in drought hard hit area and say they will have corn this year. Seeing birds now about pigeon to small grouse size now. I wouldn't know how old that would be.
 

esetter

Member
I always figured some of those really young , downy (fuzzy) feathered roosters that didn't have a defined ring yet that we have shot over the years were from a re-nest brood. Seems like we always found them in groups or at least all on the same property. When compared to the normal young of the year roosters we see , they are exceptionally less developed. Thoughts?
 
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