NEWS FLASH: Drought ends at Ponderosa

M. R. Byrd

Active member
Wanted to be the first to tell you about the drought coming to an end at the Ponderosa and that a week of soaking, beneficial rains had ended the drought.

Well, I can't actually tell you that yet, but after today we will be one day closer to an end of a very long drought. Actually, it is pretty brutal here today. Just checked an temp is 105.4, humidity is 14% and winds are variable at about 3mph and there is a fire danger warning out.

It is so dry here that the Baptists are baptizing by sprinkling, the Methodists are using wet wipes, the Presbyterians are giving out rain checks, and the Catholics are praying that the wine be turned back to water.

I am praying for rain and provision for all the creatures great and small.

God Bless,
 
Real glad that "Rain Dance" is starting to kick into high gear, I am Baptist, Lutheran and Catholic so maybe I qualify for something.
 

oldandnew

New member
It won't take much weather like that to start stressing and killing cattle in feedlots. Heat, no wind, no shade. Recipe for further suffering.
 

M. R. Byrd

Active member
Real glad that "Rain Dance" is starting to kick into high gear, I am Baptist, Lutheran and Catholic so maybe I qualify for something.
Bad news to report on the rain dance. I am absolutely desperate and had an old timer tell me to dance naked around a prickly pear, five times to the right, five times to the left. I know that no one can see me, so what the heck. I was doing a respectable job, when I went to turn to the left, wrenched my back, lost my balance, fell backwards onto the prickly pear, filled my left butt cheek with twenty-three spines, trip to the ER and 746 dollars later I was leaving. All the laughs from the ER staff, plus everyone else on staff that had to come to see, priceless for them. Daily trips to the chiroprator for the wrenched lower back and he even thinks it to be amusing.

I did have a pretty good proposal from a good looking nurse to take over my dancing, but how would that look in a small community if the word got out that Maynard had naked dancing girls up in the canyons.

Any other bright ideas?
 

PassItOn

New member
Damn the gossips, you gotta what you gotta...get that woman out there!

Mike C.

P.S. Let me know what time she starts!!!
 
i would sell the cattle and farm acreage and hire them there women for up in the hills way things are going they may be the better money maker :D
 

gsh lover

Member
Boys,
It sure sounds like it willbe thin pickens in western kansas this fall.
No way those baby chicks can survive in that heat,hell its hard for an old fart like me.It was 84 degrees,with an 87 degree heat index at 5:00am,today.,in Pitt.
 

M. R. Byrd

Active member
I think June usually is our highest rainfall month and this month is about gone and I think I have had 0.15" at the Ponderosa.
 
Bad news to report on the rain dance. I am absolutely desperate and had an old timer tell me to dance naked around a prickly pear, five times to the right, five times to the left. I know that no one can see me, so what the heck. I was doing a respectable job, when I went to turn to the left, wrenched my back, lost my balance, fell backwards onto the prickly pear, filled my left butt cheek with twenty-three spines, trip to the ER and 746 dollars later I was leaving. All the laughs from the ER staff, plus everyone else on staff that had to come to see, priceless for them. Daily trips to the chiroprator for the wrenched lower back and he even thinks it to be amusing.

I did have a pretty good proposal from a good looking nurse to take over my dancing, but how would that look in a small community if the word got out that Maynard had naked dancing girls up in the canyons.

Any other bright ideas?
Oh my, was that the young lady with one tooth?
 
Boys,
It sure sounds like it willbe thin pickens in western kansas this fall.
No way those baby chicks can survive in that heat,hell its hard for an old fart like me.It was 84 degrees,with an 87 degree heat index at 5:00am,today.,in Pitt.
Slim pickens for sure, I might drive a little further to Nebraska this year, not that there are so many birds up there but it is a thought. I would almost hate to be the one who shot one of those poor surviving roosters from last year, at least from the way it looks right now. I suppose it is going to take a couple years of normal weather for the birds to recover again. Think about the poor farmers who depend on their crops to earn a living. The whole situation is very sad.
 

KansasGsp

Member
Boys,
It sure sounds like it willbe thin pickens in western kansas this fall.
No way those baby chicks can survive in that heat,hell its hard for an old fart like me.It was 84 degrees,with an 87 degree heat index at 5:00am,today.,in Pitt.
My father in law who farms in Southwest Kansas just left the house. He said his dryland wheat got 8 bushels an acre, it's the worst he's ever had and he's been farming out there 40 years. He said he's seen a few adult birds around, but has not seen any chicks yet. He usually is pretty spot on with his reports every year and he said this year is going to be bad out there. No young birds and there's absolutely no cover.
 

M. R. Byrd

Active member
My father in law who farms in Southwest Kansas just left the house. He said his dryland wheat got 8 bushels an acre, it's the worst he's ever had and he's been farming out there 40 years. He said he's seen a few adult birds around, but has not seen any chicks yet. He usually is pretty spot on with his reports every year and he said this year is going to be bad out there. No young birds and there's absolutely no cover.
I feel for your father-in-law. There are a lot in the same boat. Yes, there is crop insurance that will soften the sting a bit, but as far as pheasants go in SW Kansas, poor wheat crop = poor pheasant crop. :(

In my travels I see a lot of dry land milo that will surely not make a crop. Some of it might be two inches tall, some maybe as high as twelve, but I have not seen a field of dry land milo that I would rate as high as fair.
 

oldandnew

New member
Crop insurance is a poor substitute for a crop! Usually get enough to replant next year, but sure doesn't do much to feed the bulldog. Like all insurance companies, not in business to pay claims, and like to haggle down the settlement. Little known fact, the agent who writes the policy and settles the claim, keeps the part of the savings from low settlements he saves the insurance company he writes for. Be alert.
 

hunter94

Active member
i am surprised anyone wasted time and money trying to grow any dryland milo. what scares me most is this could be the beginning of a 3 year drought! weather runs in cycles, anything irrigated will have a few birds around it, but the miles and miles of dryland ground will be barren.
 
Top