First time to SD - lots of questions...

BPATT11

New member
Just saying, but a new member that joined yesterday really doesn't know who to PM to ask about anything. I've been a member for almost a year and don't know who to ask about anything state specific. Real poor form to blast someone for asking for help or for an opinion. If we all read old posts what the hell do we have to walk about? Weather and crop reports? This isn't weather channel and it ain't a farming forum.

If folks Wana put their small town spots on blast, let em. But Aberdeen, Mitchell, Pierre, Miller or Chamberlain ain't exactly SD secrets. Google "best places to pheasant hunt in SD" and they can find those 5 towns on every list. When people tell me names of towns on an open forum I take them for a grain of salt. I've mentioned hunting the Chamberlain area when in reality I hunt 50 miles from Chamberlain. If some random dude found himself in my spot 50 miles away of Chamberlain due to me mentioning a popular pheasant town, good on him.
A simple google search tells you everything. Every forum I have been on says the same towns. Good lord, it isn't big game hunting.
 

Golden Hour

Well-known member
I'll make the assumption that you looked at the SDGFP map. If you look on the regular Google Earth, you'll see that the land is predominantly pasture ground. Which will make the likelihood of finding grouse much greater and I have seen grouse in that area, but I honestly don't know if you'll find a lot. At the same time, if it's all about just getting outside with the dog, it is always a blast to explore new areas and see what you discover.

There are no rattlesnakes in that area. Only close to the Missouri River and anywhere west of the river. And even though the weather patterns seem to be warmer of late, you still wouldn't have to worry about snakes the second week in November. I say this is a pretty serious ophidiophobe. :)
 

Good Boy!

Active member
The exact town naming on here is ridiculous. You are really pinning down areas to hammer. You pack all the internet scouters into that area you named above and it's too much for the resource to handle.

If you want to come hunt here do some damn reading and research old posts along with current posts about weather and crops. Send private messages to people you think will steer you right. I just think this bs of naming exact towns is very poor form. You town namers are going to be pulling up to your favorite spots to see trucks parked already or fresh tracks in the snow!
...nancy negative strikes again..."town namers"? is that a thing?
 

labrador

Active member
Do you just go around looking for my posts?

You are the gal from pennsylvania aren't you? I couldn't care less if you drive half way across the country for mediocre bird numbers. Knock yourself out. If my opinions upset you that much you might consider blocking me.
 

Dakotazeb

Well-known member
Okay guys, this thread is going south in a hurry. Let's everyone cool off and get back to the original questions or the powers to be will shut the thread down.
 

Good Boy!

Active member
Ok.... third year in a row...same town, SALEM.... just picked it out of the blue and stuck with it, not because of bird numbers but was BEFRIENDED by a SoDakotan and invited back...as to suggestions? it's all on here, but nothing more important than your dog(s) and you having a great time.... that could happen all week, one day, or maybe one retrieve... seems like there's more hours to hunt than there are legs so be sure to leave something for the G hour... spend some money on stuff you didn't need...tip well... shoot straight.
 

Good Boy!

Active member
Any input on this organization?
 

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and we think our ladiess bitch...

Bottom line is there are too many hunters vs places to hunt - so only solution is to lighten up and appreciate we can still hunt. I'm worried those days are numbered with the 'progressive' nature of this world/country.
 

Good Boy!

Active member
Too many hunters?
No matter the endeavor, those who practice that endeavor hope to entice others to share their passion, grow their endeavor, and carry it on for the next generation.
In a world where hunting and the outdoors is less of an attraction to those following behind, growing our sport is never more important.
NOW, do I want a ton of hunters adjusting my plans when I head out? Nope.
But come and hunt a State Game Land in Pennsylvania to see"hunting pressure'.... and that's why I come 19 hours and thousands of miles... to hunt wide open spaces with wiley roosters.
If I run into a group, I'll drive around the corner and jump in there...bound to be one somewhere and I only shoot at one at a time.
Too progressive? We could go back to hammer guns and paper shells.

The only thing that stays the same is change.
 

Bob Peters

Active member
Bottom line is there are too many hunters vs places to hunt
I was listening to the "It's duck season somewhere" podcast and subject of hunter numbers came up. Waterfowl hunters nationwide have been dropping very fast. The question was asked, "if there's so many fewer hunters, why is it a common complaint, "I can't find anywhere to hunt?" The answer was "access". It was stated that back in the good old days permission wasn't needed to hunt private fields, there tended to be more marshes and bird habitat in general. So I agree with your general sentiment, but at this point in time I won't let that keep me from hunting. I'll either hunt pressured birds on public spots or try and get on private ground if I can. And I hope for more good habitat on both public and private land in the future.
 

Munster927

Active member
Too many hunters?
No matter the endeavor, those who practice that endeavor hope to entice others to share their passion, grow their endeavor, and carry it on for the next generation.
In a world where hunting and the outdoors is less of an attraction to those following behind, growing our sport is never more important.
NOW, do I want a ton of hunters adjusting my plans when I head out? Nope.
But come and hunt a State Game Land in Pennsylvania to see"hunting pressure'.... and that's why I come 19 hours and thousands of miles... to hunt wide open spaces with wiley roosters.
If I run into a group, I'll drive around the corner and jump in there...bound to be one somewhere and I only shoot at one at a time.
Too progressive? We could go back to hammer guns and paper shells.

The only thing that stays the same is change.
Totally agree that the reason we have more pressured public lands isn't due to the amount of hunters but lack of available public lands.

My view is that the more people that were into hunting and cared about land/climate/habitat issues that outdoorsman care about, the more accessible it will become. Affecting how you vote and things you care about which will allow downstream impacts of the availability of quality public land.

Whenever I mention something I care about that I feel is a huge deal, to my non hunter friends they have not one clue about it nor do they care. They just shrug and go "well that sucks".

If hunters were closer to majority than the current minority, alot would be different with how land is handled.
 

benelli-banger

Well-known member
Ag economics are the biggest factor, IMO...tough to make CRP pencil out with land prices, rent prices, equipment prices, fuel prices, fertilizer prices, seed prices, etc, where they are...things must have been very different 35 years ago when so much land was enrolled in CRP...I bought marginal ground in SD in early 2000 for $600/acre that had been in CRP and just came out...the farmer that farmed the adjacent ground and had the relationship with the owner passed on the ground, as he thought that was too much, but called me to let me know ("get your checkbook out" is how he put it)...about 13-15 years later ground right there was selling for 6k/acre...tough to justify doing anything with it but farming it at that price...now, land prices dipped since then to around 4k-5k, depending, but now I'd say it's flirting with the prior highs of 6-8 years ago. a young farmer who is renting ground for $200/acre probably has another $300-400 per acre in costs...bringing the total to $500+ per acre...last year at harvest corn was barely $3/bushel...so 170 bushel corn was break-even...this year, corn is much higher, but yields will be lower due to the severe drought...my farmer buddy HOPES for 100 bushel corn...and that would require weekly rains for the next month+. Don't know the answer, but I know why suicides in farm country are quite prevalent and why there are lots of outreach programs for this risk. Don't get me wrong, suicide pervades all pockets of society--I have lost 4 friends to suicide--but the nature of farming/ranching is such that it is a real risk...quite isolated, farmers are strong, proud people, services are often long distances away, etc...kind of a "perfect storm"...in the little town where I own land and hunt, I know lots of the locals, and I have gotten a phone call more than once from the local bar owner suggesting that I call so and so, as he seemed very down, or very out of sorts...that kind of thing. Life can be tough no matter where we are or what we do for a living...bottom line, when I'm socializing with farmers, which I do a lot, not just in the fall, I try to look at things from their point of view. It gets even harder when a farm father is trying to blend one or more kids into the operation and provide a living for the child and his/her family...that's when a lot of incremental costs come into the equation, as more land is needed, and that ain't cheap!!!! renting or buying. And it may not even be available in the neighborhood. I have great respect for farmers and ranchers. I know I would have a hard time with the uncertainty. Yes, there are safety nets, but I would still have a very hard time.
 

Matt D

Active member
From watching land sales and talking to others since the beginning of this year there are two things jumping out. Prices are climbing with some areas hitting all time high's and more and more land is getting listed for sale or to be auctioned. Combination of inflation fear and high crop prices are driving both IMO. While I am in the agricultural business here in OH the farming risks in SD are substantially different due to the weather that is much more variable and extreme. As land prices increase it typically doesn't bode well for the birds as the money to pay for that land is in raising crops not birds. Not sure what this all means long term for hunting?
 

haymaker

Well-known member
It means hunting is going to get more expensive. Probably more released birds. As we face possible food shortages like we are seeing other shortages the cost to produce a wild bird only hunt like I have for the past 20 years is no longer practical. With the prices that we are going to see for commodities I can no longer dedicate the acres that I have in the past. This makes me sad but I have to be a realist too. My hunting clients this fall will get to vote on the future of hunting here.
 
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It means hunting is going to get more expensive. Probably more released birds. As we face possible food shortages like we are seeing other shortages the cost to produce a wild bird only hunt like I have for the past 20 years is no longer practical. With the prices that we are going to see for commodities I can no longer dedicate the acres that I have in the past. This makes me sad but I have to be a realist too. My hunting clients this fall will get to vote on the future of hunting here.
Oh so true. But than I never saw the soil bank days , but heard about them. I did see the early crp days and enjoyed them immensely. Two years ago none of us would have projected this last 2 years, that said being an optimist I can't help but wonder what change in the world will bring about a change in farming practices. Electric cars? Will that finally get rid of the ethanol boondoggle and make crp or a like program more in demand. Today things look grim, declining habitat, declining hunter recruitment, declining access, and I could go on. Hunters are a small minority of the voting population and as a result we are far down the list as to having our requests answered. But who knows maybe the Monarc butterfly people will get a politician elected that puts a priority on them and as a result upland habitat. Far fetched, but whose crystal ball would have thought we would have had what we have had these last couple years.
 

BRITTMAN

Well-known member
Killed plenty of birds before CRP and that was in both ND and SD. I was pretty young then ... teens and twenties. Boots to the ground. My first dog was not as polished as those that came behind him either.

Sure the pheasant commercial ops will have to figure something different out or bale out. Always pheasants around ... maybe not in the crazy numbers ... but moving a dozen to three dozen in an afternoon and a decent chance for a limit for one, two or may be three guys. That kind of hunting will survive.

Pre-CRP late season ... had says where we moved 100s if not 500 or more.... Mix of private land and public land ... all farmed and ranched ... birds made due with what was given them.
 
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