Looking for family/hunting dog

mla1967

New member
i hunt pheasant and grouse, I am looking for a family friendly dog that has a good temperament. I am thinking a female that is will be spayed. I was going to get a ESS but the dog only had one female. I would like a dog that is easy to train and is good with kids. I live in Minnesota so would like to find something local. Also would like to have a medium size dog up to 50 lbs.
Thanks
 

Miforester

Member
I second KSBrittman, sounds like a Brittany would be a great choice, had them all my life and they have all been great hunters and family members.
 

Matt D

Member
There are many options for you with what you have said your are looking for. Since you said you were originally looking for and ESS you might want to check with FCSpringer from this site and see if he can help you at all. Good luck in your search and let us know what you end up with.
 

Shawk

Member
Biggest question is... are you married and what kind of preferences does your wife have? ;) My wife gave me the green light for a second dog this spring but had two requests: 1) another GSP for it's short hair being in the house and 2) another all liver GSP also for cleaning, etc. Does the hair length and color really matter, likely not much but it did to her. Soooo, this spring I came home with another GSP that is... um... well... yeah... white/liver. :D I'll save that story for another time but I did fill 1 of the 2 requests she made. My wife and kids quickly fell for her.

Prior to our current GSP's I had a Brittany that was "mine" as well. So why not another Brittany after she passed?? Simple... everyone loved the silly dog so much that we selfishly didn't want to be reminded of her with another Brittany pup. She was fabulous just like our older GSP now. Both breeds have been incredibly good at home, eager to please, and hunt like their lives depend on it. Can't go wrong with either one IMO.

Be sure you know the breeder and dogs you get a pup from... some breed these dogs bigger than you might think. My Britt was 36-38 lbs, my GSP pup will finish at 40 or so and my older GSP is 48. I'm a big fan of these sizes around the house and in the field. Good luck and be sure to update us when you bring your pup home. :thumbsup:
 

Hockeybob

Member
I've owned everything from Britts, German short hair, labs, all are good. Hunted 8 years ago with a small Munsterlander and then bought one pup "Gunner".
Gunner is now 6 years old and we just bought another SM pup Lily.
My wife and I agree for hunting and family we will never get another breed.
 

mla1967

New member
I like both pointers and flushing dogs size is probably the biggest factor besides being good with kids.
 

mnaj_springer

New member
The pointer/flusher question may determine which you choose. My experience is that a flusher can make a serviceable hunting dog sooner. There's just more moving parts with a pointing dog. I've also noticed that I'm able to train my springer with less birds (and by default, less land) than my pointer.

Also, what you plan to hunt most may dictate what you choose. Both types can and will hunt most everything you go after but there are pros and cons. My springer is great on everything, but following her in the pheasant fields is much easier than in the grouse woods. My pointer can pin down roosters but she really shines with grouse, especially because she can cover ground while I walk on the trail.
 

mla1967

New member
I think that I will still look for a ESS , I am not sure if I have the know how to train a pointer. Plus I have heard that ESS is a pheasant hunting machine. If anyone knows of any upcoming litters. I would like a female.
 

mnaj_springer

New member
I think that I will still look for a ESS , I am not sure if I have the know how to train a pointer. Plus I have heard that ESS is a pheasant hunting machine. If anyone knows of any upcoming litters. I would like a female.
They are made by God for pheasants. But it may be more of a truism to say they are bird-finding machines. The difficulty of hunting ruffed grouse with my springer is strictly do to my limitations, specifically walking through the woods without get slapped in the face by branches.
 

mla1967

New member
They are made by God for pheasants. But it may be more of a truism to say they are bird-finding machines. The difficulty of hunting ruffed grouse with my springer is strictly do to my limitations, specifically walking through the woods without get slapped in the face by branches.
I mostly hunt pheasant anyway and I have had no problems hunting grouse without a dog.
 

ranchodeluxe

New member
Have you considered a rescue Spaniel?

http://www.springerrescue.org/

I have gone both routes, the high-dollar world-class pup of immaculate breeding, and the rescue route. I didn't go wrong either time. Saving a dog from the green needle is a feeling that never goes away. I put my rescue dog in the field with some pretty expensive dogs with snobby owners. He more than holds his own.
 

goldenboy

Well-known member
Check out my website. I raise goldens. My females are around 45-50 pounds. Small but full of drive. Great around the house. Love to hunt pheasants. Just great dogs. I always say you hunt for about 3-4 months of the year, you have to like the dog the rest of the time! I am also local. I live in Minnesota.
nelsonkennel.com
 
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