Heath Clearances?

Health clearances vary somewhat from breed to breed.most breed clubs can help with the minimum tests they highly recommend. That being the case as a investment there are many extra tests that can be done.
Keep in mind some like thyroid heart eyes all need to be done about every 2 years.
 
For Small Munsterlanders, the only required health clearance is hips. Before any dog can be approved for breeding they must have their hips evaluated by OFA or PennHip. For OFA they have to be either a "Good" or "Excellent" to breed. No other clearances are required as there isnt really any known health issues with the breed. If some started popping up, I'm sure the breed club would require those tests as well.
 
It becomes challenging to avoid all genetic issues even with extensive health testing. The best we can do is minimize the serious faults that limit good health and performance. Pick wisely.
 
I have been working with Auburn University's Canine Performance Program (detection dogs). They have very stringent health testing criteria. Here is a list of what they require. Some tests may be overkill IE OFA and PENNHIP. Semen and Brucellosis only pertains to breeding
OFA Hips, and elbows
Pennhip hips
Spine Radiograph
Cerf annually
EIC
PRA-pred
CNM
SD2 Stargart
Semen eval
Brucellosis for stud 30 days prior to breeding

Some tests may be overkill IE OFA and PENNHIP. Semen and Brucellosis only pertains to breeding
 
I've always assumed these health guarantees would be about like getting warranty work paid for. They'll always find someway it wasn't their fault. I'm curious if anyone has ever had issues and how breeders actually handle them? Seems like a lot of variables a good lawyer would have fun with.
 
I know of a couple. The most recent was a friend who purchased a female gsp puppy. Had it for almost two years and had her hips checked prior to breeding. They came back bad, withboth types of tests. He contacted the breeder and after some back and forth on the breeders test of the sire and dam (both had good hip tests) the owner was told to keep the dog and not breed her and the breeder return the full purchase price.
 
I've always assumed these health guarantees would be about like getting warranty work paid for. They'll always find someway it wasn't their fault. I'm curious if anyone has ever had issues and how breeders actually handle them? Seems like a lot of variables a good lawyer would have fun with.
I've never had a "Warranty Issue", but the couple people I know that have had were treated fairly by the breeders.
Responsible breeders are responsible people I think.
 
I've never had a "Warranty Issue", but the couple people I know that have had were treated fairly by the breeders.
Responsible breeders are responsible people I think.
Yeah, I guess my question stems from a dog a family member had that had hip issues at like age 3-4. Now this dog had been through a ton of training while gaining titles so I always attributed her issues to overwork. But had my family member went back to the breeder to cover her guaranteed hips how does that scenario play out?
 
I've always assumed these health guarantees would be about like getting warranty work paid for. They'll always find someway it wasn't their fault. I'm curious if anyone has ever had issues and how breeders actually handle them? Seems like a lot of variables a good lawyer would have fun with.
There are genetic tests on the dam and sire such that there is no question if there is a potential problem and buyer look elsewhere.
For example, if both parents test EIC as carrier big problem and look elsewhere.
 
Yeah, I guess my question stems from a dog a family member had that had hip issues at like age 3-4. Now this dog had been through a ton of training while gaining titles so I always attributed her issues to overwork. But had my family member went back to the breeder to cover her guaranteed hips how does that scenario play out?
I have never seen a warranty of 36-48 months, 26 months is the norm. OFA requires a dog to be at least 24 months for testing, and 26 months gives you the time to have them tested. Once out of the warranty period I doubt the breeder would assume any responsibility nor should they. As the owners of athletes we have the responsibility to minimize injury, and provide the necessary well care IE food, vet care, and supplements like glucosamine.
Its a shame when issues crop up later in life but I don't know how you would apply bad luck to the breeder unless they misrepresented health clearance results.
 

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I've always assumed these health guarantees would be about like getting warranty work paid for. They'll always find someway it wasn't their fault. I'm curious if anyone has ever had issues and how breeders actually handle them? Seems like a lot of variables a good lawyer would have fun with.
I had an issue with a Lab and his hips. We identified his hip problem around 7 months old. The breeder was really good in how he handled it.
 
As a golden retriever breeder we have a ton of tests to perform. It is very important to educate yourself on these things when looking for a new dog. K9DATA is a great place to look. In the opening page you can put the breed of dog, then you can find almost any well bred dog in that breed. Here is a sample of one of my dog's and all the testing that goes into giving a health guarantee.
Call name:"Randi"
Gender:F
Country of origin:USA
Country of residence:USA
State of residence:MN
Registration:AKC SS13670601
Breeder:Joel Nelson
Owner:Joel Nelson
Web site:https://www.nelsonkennel.com/
Hip clearance:OFA GR-134021G24F-VPI
Eye clearance:OFA GR-EYE23975/24F-VPI (7/21)
Heart clearance:OFA GR-ACA7056/24F-VPI
Elbow clearance:OFA GR-EL53642F24-VPI
prcd-PRA status:Carrier
PRA1 status:Clear
PRA2 status:Clear
Ichthyosis status:Carrier
DM status:Clear
NCL status:Clear
 
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