Chicks

1pheas4

Super Moderator
Pheas, Do you know what is in the shot?[/QUOTE


FC, I have to look this information up when I get some time. I'm assuming it's common knowledge among those who work in the poultry industry what drug is used to kill nematodes. Maybe someone else knows. O&N may be right.

Doses where given prior to release through the use oral syringes.
 

mnmthunting

Banned
:confused:
FOR THE FORTH TIME! trust me.:)

The drug in the shot IS [TETRAMISOL HYDROCHORIDE]

It's given orally [feed, water or a shot in the mouth]
 

1pheas4

Super Moderator
:confused:
FOR THE FORTH TIME! trust me.:)

The drug in the shot IS [TETRAMISOL HYDROCHORIDE]

It's given orally [feed, water or a shot in the mouth]

That's my bad Wayne. I didn't read through everyone's posts from this past week and the ones I did read I skimmed through real quick.:eek: Sorry brother and thanks for the info;):cheers:
 

FCSpringer

Super Moderator
OK then I guess the birds are imunized then. We have used the medicated feed for eons. Nothing new:thumbsup:
 

1pheas4

Super Moderator
OK then I guess the birds are imunized then. We have used the medicated feed for eons. Nothing new:thumbsup:
Once fed medicated feed, are birds immune to parasites for the duration of being in the pen or out in the wild? Not sure:confused: Can anyone way in on that one?

Anyway, just thought some would find it interesting that predation on the nest decreased when hens were rid of parasites vs. those that where not. For some, that's kind of new in a way I suppose. Obviously you are correct FC, medicated pheasant food is not anything new.:)
 
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FCSpringer

Super Moderator
Any way, it seems to work fine none the less to put the strong healthy birds out there to boost an areas population. I haven't seen this many chicks on the road ever. Now watch, the road side counts will be down, LOL.:D
 

1pheas4

Super Moderator
I haven't seen this many chicks on the road ever. Now watch, the road side counts will be down, LOL.:D
Yep. I was thinking the same thing with the birds around here. Maybe we're being too optimistic and overly hopeful? But like you said in a previous post, "poofs in the pudding". The signs are all pointing up.:thumbsup:
 

mnmthunting

Banned
There is no vaccination for worms. How often do you worm your dogs?
The medication in "medicated feed" would be a broad spectrum antibiotic, won't get rid of the worms.
At about 10-14 weeks of age a wormer should be added to the water or feed. Easy to do just add proper amount to the water and your birds are wormed. If your going to release your pheasants one worming is enough. Those that your keeping for breeding should be wormed at least once a year, twice is better.

It is sure easy to see why pheasants with a parasite problem are easy prey for predators.

Like in domestic animals, cattle etc. A critter with worms is NOT a good doing critter:eek: Rough hair, skinny, little or no growth, just plan sickly looking and of little value. Get rid of the parasites and they are looking better in a matter of days. :cheers:
 

mnmthunting

Banned
Another thing I think about as far as Worms in Pheasants. Pen raised pheasants are in a small area, worm eggs Are in the dirt in the pens by the millions, probably billions and will last for years. All pen raised pheasants will have worms, more then we realize. Like all animals that I know of.

Wild pheasants on the other hand are on the move, still exposed to worms but not close to the concentration.
I don't ever recall running into sickly wild birds while hunting, so I'm not sure that WE, in North America should be concerned about it?
 

1pheas4

Super Moderator
I don't ever recall running into sickly wild birds while hunting, so I'm not sure that WE, in North America should be concerned about it?

Again, I was simply mentioning two separate studies that showed nesting success went up in hens that where void of certain parasites (parasites we have here in the U.S. and abroad--as you know) vs. those that were not.

Could the findings be rigged, faulty, sloppy science, or carelessly performed? Could numbers/tags/collars on birds been marked wrong or crossed over? Could it be that our birds don't have problems with parasites like in other counties? Maybe our strain is immune to such things? Sure. Though I'm a bit doubtful that is the case. But you never know.:)

We don't know why nesting success goes up in birds that are void of parasites. Again, the theory (just a theory) is that the birds become "gassy" and in turn put more sent in the air, hence, making it easier for predators to pick up on nesting hens. This is despite their ability to become virtually scentless (externally) while on the nest.

Do these studies apply to birds raised in the U.S.? If we didn't have these parasites here in the U.S. I'd say no. But we do have them here and God knows we have a number of issues with predation on the nesting birds (for multiple and some very obvious reasons).

Can pen and wild hens nest successfully with these parasites living in their guts? Absolutely they can. This is particularly true in areas with prime, large amounts of habitat for birds to nest in successfully. There's simply so much space and so many birds predators can't cover all the ground and hit all the nests. Or, in a case with great predator control. This obviously works too.

If all birds were some how miraculously rid of all parasites would we see a jump in nesting success within pen birds (in the wild)? I believe so, but this is just my two cents and we all know where that leads us:D



P.S.--I have shot wild birds that look very sick. So have others within my group. It's rare, but it is out there. As you said, there is no need for concern within our wild stock. --At least I hope that's the case-- It could be an issue for our wild birds here in Illinois. For now, it's genetics and inbreeding that are being looked into as to why our birds (even in areas with the proper habitat) are not increasing as they where prior to 1996.

God only knows why my friends. I just hope we figure things out soon. I miss the days of flushing a few hundred grouped up wild birds during a late winter hunt around here!
 
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