16 gauge; It really is a illness

jalinkly

New member
Did it again. Another sixteen to the collection. This one is a late 1940's "Sweet Sixteen" A5 to go along with my new model; which I really like. Not perfect but perfect for hunting.

I've really got to start making more time for using these.
 

jonnyB

New member
I have a early 1940's A5, 12ga. Still works. However, it doesn't have the speed load that was introduced in the 50's. Would be interested in hearing how your new A5 is working...
 

ithacafan

New member
Agreed but just wait till you get into pump guns, over unders and side x sides... I have a a couple of each! Only one semi auto though. 1939 Savage 720... the poor man's A5. The 16 is the best gauge for pheasant, in my opinion.
 

jalinkly

New member
Agreed but just wait till you get into pump guns, over unders and side x sides... I have a a couple of each! Only one semi auto though. 1939 Savage 720... the poor man's A5. The 16 is the best gauge for pheasant, in my opinion.
I already do. In addition to the old and new A5, I have a Browning Citori Gran Lightning, a Fox Model B, a Stevens SxS and a Model 12 w/ 2 9/16 chamber. Plus my old single shot. All sixteens.
 

ithacafan

New member
Albeit a fact-based opinion.
Thanks for pointing that out... it is a fact based opinion... I just didn't want to start any arguments with the 20 and 28 gauge guys.
And to you jalinkly, that is a nice selection of 16's. I have a plain jane Citori in 16... I'd love to get some higher grade wood for it like your Gran Lightning. If you ever get a chance to buy one, pick up a Marlin 90 in 16. They are great field guns.
 

Quickdraw

New member
I just bought a BPS 16 ga grade 3. It has nickle plated receiver with engraving on each side. Pheasants on one side duck on the other. It's ahandsom piece. I also have a field model 16. Glad to see I'm not the only one with the sickness
 

A5 Sweet 16

New member
Thanks for pointing that out.
No problem ithacafan. I'm good for throwing tact & understanding to the wind & making broad generalizations, especially when I have no idea what I'm talking about & absolutely no back-up. Shear luck that in this case, I'm right, as are other 16 fanatics! Other gauges pale in comparison to a 16 for roosters. It's just the way it is. No use trying to convince me otherwise. I'm not open to other considerations.
 

ithacafan

New member
No problem ithacafan. I'm good for throwing tact & understanding to the wind & making broad generalizations, especially when I have no idea what I'm talking about & absolutely no back-up. Shear luck that in this case, I'm right, as are other 16 fanatics! Other gauges pale in comparison to a 16 for roosters. It's just the way it is. No use trying to convince me otherwise. I'm not open to other considerations.
I couldn't have said it better myself. My 16 gauge guns all weigh under 7 pounds. My 1941 Ithaca 37 and 1925 Ithaca sxs are both really close to 6 pounds even. And with #5 copper plated lead, the pheasants don't fly far.
 

s.davis

Member
Would love to find a Marlin. Heard nothing but good things about them. I’ve never seen one in any gauge.
My primary pheasant gun is a 16 ga. Model 90. Not the most refined gun ever, but it feels workmanlike and pleasantly gruff. I appreciate a gun I can carry in rough weather and rough foliage without worrying too much about.
 

ithacafan

New member
My primary pheasant gun is a 16 ga. Model 90. Not the most refined gun ever, but it feels workmanlike and pleasantly gruff. I appreciate a gun I can carry in rough weather and rough foliage without worrying too much about.
Great description of the Model 90. It is a blue collar gun for sure. Oil finish, filed rib, nice bluing.
The other thing I love about mine is the double triggers. I wish my Citori had that feature.

 

ithacafan

New member
I was lucky and got this one at a live auction last year for $300 in really nice original shape. I took it to South Dakota.
 
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ole_270

New member
It really is. I've about quit using everything else since I got a 16 ga Dickinson SxS about 3 years ago. Cheesy has a late 40s M37 and now a sweet SxS made in Suhl Germany in 1919 by Venus Gunworks, Oscar Will. I load for all three, everything from light 7/8 oz and 1 oz low pressure for the German sxS to 1 1/8 oz heavy 5s for pheasants.
I started out with a 16 ga Mossberg 500 in the mid 60s, but the folks got tired of trying to find loads for it as they became rarer. Went to a 12 or 20 for most of my life. Now I'm finally back to the purple hull.
 

Dakotazeb

Active member
Purple Power! Gotta love those purple hulls. I wish all the manufacturers would make their 16 ga. shells with purple hulls. Shooting any other color in a 16 just doesn't seem right. :)
 

Ericb

Member
I picked a '51 Ithaca 37 in 16ga recently. Got sold on the idea from guys in another forum. I'll have to make time to get out with it because the gun is definitely made for the uplands.
 

ithacafan

New member
I picked a '51 Ithaca 37 in 16ga recently. Got sold on the idea from guys in another forum. I'll have to make time to get out with it because the gun is definitely made for the uplands.
Nice to see you over here Eric. A few of the guys over on SGW hunt but a lot don't. You need to be over here to get the habitat information.
I'm bringing my 37's with me this year (in 16 gauge of course). The Fiocchi #5 copper plated shells (Golden Pheasant) cycle great in the M37 and really hammer the birds. Good luck!
 

Ericb

Member
Thanks! I’m really torn. I bought a new over under earlier this year in 12ga, and I want to get birds with that but i’ve been a pumpgun guy since forever. Guess I’ll have to get out more to use more guns. I’m a couple hours from the South Dakota border, so I’ll make time to change it up a little.
 
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