First trip to SD, need advice

andyd

New member
I have just booked my first trip to Chamberlin, SD for the days following Thanksgiving 2019. Ive never hunted pheasant, but have many quail hunts under my belt here in TX. Im curious about the weather conditions that time of year and how to 'gear up' appropriately. Obviously weather is always a wild card, but a generalization will do. Any direction for gear/clothing that will be appropriate for the time of year is welcomed and appreciated.
Thanks
 

Richard

New member
Andy, just be prepared. Two years ago I hunted that time period, warm and very windy. Last year wind chills below zero. I will be in Chamberlain the first of November. Where you staying at? Have fun South Dakota is blast to hunt!!
 

chriswhite22

New member
I was up there at that time a few years back. The first day when I left to hunt is was -5. A couple days later it was in the low 40's. You'll love it up in SD. It's a great place!
 

andyd

New member
Andy, just be prepared. Two years ago I hunted that time period, warm and very windy. Last year wind chills below zero. I will be in Chamberlain the first of November. Where you staying at? Have fun South Dakota is blast to hunt!!
We are staying/hunting thru Rooster Ridge. I had an opportunity to purchase the trip at a live auction and am excited to try something new and different! This will be each member in my groups first pheasant hunt and I can already see us getting addicted...
 

Dakotazeb

Active member
Rooster Ridge has some good advice regarding gear when planning your hunt. As others have said, the weather in SD that time of year can vary greatly. Be prepared for all weather conditions. Dress in layers. Chaps or brush pants are a good idea as well as good boots. Be sure to wear an orange vest and cap.
 

5akman

New member
We hunt the first week/weekend in Nov and have had temps from the mid teens with howling winds to the mid 40's. As mentioned, be prepared with layers and I find I need to focus more on head/hand comfort than anything else. If you're a "driver" you'll work up a sweat no matter what the temps. If a "blocker" you'll be expending less energy and I find I get much colder than when I walk through or "drive" the fields.
 

Highvoltage

New member
We hunt Thanksgiving week ever year. It’s like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get. But usually you are able to walk on water.
 

david0311

Member
Near where I guide —

What everyone above has said—could be in high 40’s to well below zero—
Layers—the last thing you want to do is walk first working up a sweat —then trying to block-
Several types of gloves—hand warmer packets—I always have some to hand out but bring your own in case your guide is not as good:rolleyes::mad:
Face masks-balaclavia(sp) several weights from silk to heavy wool
Several pairs of boots- insulated including one pair of—Muck type for mud
Sure others will add other things-just what I insist on having myself
 

andyd

New member
All of this is great intel! Thanks gents! One more question- what would be your typical layering formula to not be too hot/cold for lets say: 30-40, 10-30, below 10? If those breakdowns are off please correct- i am a sponge soaking up all the information i can get, ha.
 

OKhunter88

New member
All of this is great intel! Thanks gents! One more question- what would be your typical layering formula to not be too hot/cold for lets say: 30-40, 10-30, below 10? If those breakdowns are off please correct- i am a sponge soaking up all the information i can get, ha.
30-40: Pants and t-shirt if wind is light. Light hoodie if wind is blowing.

10-30: light long johns, pants, midweight long sleeve shirt and hoodie.

Below 10: fleece lined long johns, pants, midweight long sleeve shirt, hoodie, wind resistant jacket.

If it’s sunny and no wind I’ve worn just a hoodie down to around 0. If you are walking through cover you will be surprised how warm you can stay. The hardest part is figuring out how to keep your hands and face warm.
 

Highvoltage

New member
All of this is great intel! Thanks gents! One more question- what would be your typical layering formula to not be too hot/cold for lets say: 30-40, 10-30, below 10? If those breakdowns are off please correct- i am a sponge soaking up all the information i can get, ha.
Sorry I can’t dress you. Everyone handles cold differently, but I will tell you to have a light wind break layer.
 

Dakotazeb

Active member
For my base layer I try to stay away from anything made of cotton. When cotton gets wet (via sweat or whatever) it stays wet. I like my base layer to be of a good wicking type material. Same for socks. A good sock liner (wicking type) with a light/mid weight Merino wool sock over that.
 
The day before this picture, it was 60* out and sunny. We wore t-shirts and orange baseball hats. The next day, it was below zero, blowing 40+ MPH and snowing. He took every piece of clothing we had in the truck and put it on. Carhartt bibs, windproof jacket and beanie, wool sweaters and 2 pairs of gloves and a fleece baclava. I have no idea how he shot this bird, much less his limit that day. Not once did he complain. Pretty good for only being 14.

View attachment 9232
 
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jackrabbit

New member
Used to live in Chamberlain, still return to that area 2x a year (once in early mid November and once in early mid December), and now live in Minnesota where I hunt in all weather conditions. Lots of variables. *Most likely* you will have morning temps in the teens and daytime temps in the 30s that time of the year. That said, you could literally have everything from -10 and a blizzard to 60 and sunny. Now, everybody (and dog) handles the weather differently, and 40 and wind is a lot colder than 20 and pure sun with no wind. You'll be amazed how quickly you will warm up, especially if you are somebody that can put on a lot of miles. Finding the right amount of clothing that will keep you warm, but not allow you to sweat too much will be key. When the sweat dries, that's when you'll get cold.

If its in that 15-40 range, I will probably go with a hooded sweatshirt and either a wind breaker jacket over or a thermal long sleeve (long john type) shirt under, but not both. If its 15 or under, then I'd go with all 3. I try to avoid bulkier coats, like my carhartt coat, I just don't like them while hunting and prefer the thinner layers. For lower body, I just wear my normal upland pants for most hunts, unless its getting to that zero degree range then I'll add a pair of long johns or Under Armour tights. I have stayed away from bibs or anything that restricts my hip/leg movements too much, I can really feel that in my hip flexors after multiple days hunting.

For feet, I have 400 gram danner pronghorns that I use year round. If it's really cold you could add wool socks. But you are constantly moving, so cold feet usually isn't a problem. I also have Muck Arctic Pros, but they usually get too warm for hunting, no matter how cold.

The real struggle I run into is hands. I have struggled to find the perfect glove, warm ones are too bulky. Thin ones and my trigger finger goes numb. What I have found that works for me, but it's still not great, is to wear a thick glove on my left hand and hold my gun with that, and wear a very thin or no glove in my right hand, but keep my right hand in my fleece lined vest pocket holding a hand warmer, then pull it out of the pocket quick to shoot.
 

joeg

New member
Take a look at these
Keeps you warm in SD and the western slope of the Rockies.


Bright Orange Carhartt A202 Front ViewBright Orange
 

jonnyB

New member
I agree with the "cold hands" issue. Have had surgery on one hand and frost bite on the other - both are sensitive to cold. And at 81 my circulation isn't what it used to be! I have cold hands inside the house in the winter.

I bought electric gloves several years ago and they work well. I use a mitten on the left hand with heat packet; I find I don't need a glove to hold the gun. The right hand varies: a heat packet on top of the hand, with a glove, works OK. With extreme cold and low windchill, I go with the electric glove - a little slower on the mount et al, gives the roosters a more sporting chance...
 

jonnyB

New member
ASC: My gloves are Thermologic, bought them on line. The left hand glove went dead last season, called the company and they sent a new pair and batteries! One year warranty. I've had them for 2-3 years and only wear them when it's very cold.

They fit well, although I did alter a couple of fingers...

Jon
 

Rooster Shooter

New member
All the advice is great, and the layer suggestion is huge. The things I would add is this: 1.) make sure that you avoid wearing cotton based clothing, does not wick moisture away and you will get cold. 2.) good quality socks to go with the boots/shoes. I always wear two layers a silk liner and heavier over sock, this provides for blister prevention. 3.) Casual clothes for in the evening to wear, sweat pants, slippers and such.
 
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