Dog bell

John Singer

New member
Do you use a bell for pheasant or grouse.

I would never put a bell on my dog while pheasant hunting.

I purchased a cheap small cowbell from Amazon for my dog when grouse hunting.
 

Nasty-G

New member
I'm guessing the thinking is scaring the birds, however there is a train of thought bells make the birds hunker down therefore providing closer shots. These discussions are best held around a fire with sufficient quantities of brown liquid.
 

jonnyB

New member
I use a bell in very high grass or sorghum - to keep track of my very aggressive retriever. Doesn't seem to bother the birds or influence their behavior, at least not that I can discern. If it made a difference, I wouldn't use it...
 

jonnyB

New member
Good morning to you too, Dennis! Sister-in-law - Mobridge, sez lots of snow in the past couple of day's. Same with you?
Hope your bird population held up well this past winter...
 

haymaker

Active member
Good morning to you too, Dennis! Sister-in-law - Mobridge, sez lots of snow in the past couple of day's. Same with you?
Hope your bird population held up well this past winter...
We have snow but over all the winter was not that bad. Bird numbers are low due to the previous winter. We need a good hatch.
 

BritChaser

New member
I'm a long time bell user in conditions where I can't see the dog. I agree with jonnyB that pheasants do not seem spooked by the bell.

As far as which bell, a lower pitched bell will carry farther.

The last thing I want to look at when I'm afield is an electronic devise in my hand. With a bell my head is up and my eyes follow the sound of the bell. But that's just me. ;)
 

Miforester

New member
I run a bell and beeper collar on silent mode, once the dog goes on point I hit the locate button if I don't see her/them. I do this in both the woods and fields. Been running bells for better part of 40 years and have never had an issue with dogs pinning either pheasants or grouse. Lower tones tend to carry sound better in the wind.
 

remy3424

Member
Do you use a bell for pheasant or grouse.

I would never put a bell on my dog while pheasant hunting.

I purchased a cheap small cowbell from Amazon for my dog when grouse hunting.
This fella hasn't/or doesn't hunt switchgrass or big bluestem. I have a couple spots I wouldn't want a dog in it without a bell, more than 15 feet away and you can't see your dog, if the wind is blowing you can't tell where they are. I keep my bell on a snap swivel, only use it when neccessary and take it off when not needed. Can't prove it hurts, but I "feel" without the bell, the dog has an advantage.
 

BRITTMAN

New member
I was a bell man for 30 years with my Brittanys. Just the simple one that most stores and places tend to sell. I rarely use one now. Garmin Astro.
 

3car

New member
I keep a keen eye on the cattail tops. I am convinced beepers, yelling at dogs, too many hunters in the field, pickup doors slamming all help the rooster to get away!
 

Nasty-G

New member
I totally agree with 3car. I equate wild pheasant hunting to deer hunting. A single hunter and his dog are a team. That's what makes it fun.
 

John Singer

New member
This fella hasn't/or doesn't hunt switchgrass or big bluestem. I have a couple spots I wouldn't want a dog in it without a bell, more than 15 feet away and you can't see your dog, if the wind is blowing you can't tell where they are. I keep my bell on a snap swivel, only use it when neccessary and take it off when not needed. Can't prove it hurts, but I "feel" without the bell, the dog has an advantage.
I hunt mostly public land and I do hunt blue stem and switchgrass. I am concerned with stealth when pheasant hunting, especially in the late season. During the late season, with pressured birds on public land, many flushes occur out of gun range. I doubt a bell would be beneficial.

This discussion has me thinking, though. One place where a bell may be helpful is when driving a cornfield. I often lose track of my dog in corn, however if the exits are posted, wild flushing birds should not be a problem.
 

A5 Sweet 16

New member
I doubt a bell would be beneficial.
John, that's one of the most diplomatic statements I've ever read on this site. I agree 100%. With wild, educated birds....ANY noise is too much noise. For me, anyway, because shooting pheasants is my goal. Are there legitimate reasons for bells? Yes. Can a bell ever make you MORE productive? I suppose anything's possible. But more often than not, with birds that have played the game before, hunter/dog noise is to the pheasant's benefit.
 

jmuller19

New member
Just curious, bell noise may make more noise, but do you believe that the wild pheasants don't hear you or the dog anyways. I use a bell so I can keep track of my dog. I think, in my opinion, there probably is no right or wrong only what works best for you.
 

jonnyB

New member
I don't see birds jumping up way ahead, due to dog noise/bell, I do see dog(s) bumping birds way ahead of the hunter, hence the rationale of using a bell to determine the location of the dog (in high grass et al) and calling him back. I don't enjoy walking corn or high grass - continually wondering where the dog is...

I do have an overly aggressive, very high prey drive dog. He's been a challenge to train! I hope this is a "diplomatic statement."
 
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