Opening day???

Maggie&Max-GSP

New member
How did everyone do on opening day? how are the bird numbers you are seeing? we had 16 points on opening day with 18 birds up at dillion state park we are all pretty bad shots though we only killed 10!:10sign:
 

huntsem

New member
My dog and I got our two Ohio birds on each of two outings in N.E. Ohio but that's all we put up.
ODNR sucks in regards to serving birds hunters. I second Reilly's note on hunting Pa.... and so does my dog.
I may not even waste any more of my dog's precious time bird hunting in Ohio.
I feel sorry for all the folks and their hunting dogs with all those empty game bags that I see when I'm hunting in Ohio.
I wonder if the State isn't trying to make bird hunters get discouraged as the interest in birds numbers conflicts with big ag. and land developers. The State actually stocked twice as many birds in the 1930's as they do today and how many less people populated the State back then? The stocking years ago was addition to an established wild bird population.
Shameful...
 
Last edited:

bauerline

New member
The birds you get to hunt in PA are not wild. The PGC is releasing 200,00 pheasants state wide this year. They stocked at the start of October for the youth hunt, one preseason stocking and then one stocking per week with this week being the last stocking. Some parts of the state do get some birds in late December. The birds are released on state game lands, state parks and some private land that is enrolled in a cooperative program with the PGC. I have been out as much as possible this year and I was able to get into birds each time. I didn't always get a bird but me and the dogs are having a blast.
 

gobucks

New member
If it doesnt gobble or grunt the ODNR doesnt care about it. Ive been out a few times and kicked up a two roosters on public ground. Waiting for deer season to be over this week to be able to hunt some private CRP i have permission to hit.
 

lovemylabs

New member
went to ceasers creek thanksgiving morning and jumped several and shot quite a few got my 2 limit by 9am and several in our group as well and everyone out were good fellas it seemed one guy loaned me his dog to help find one of my birds that was lost for a minute that dog was a god send as my labs are now retired i just wish ohio had more wild birds but to have that i would assume we would also need more coyote hunters
 

lovemylabs

New member
The coyotes aren't the problem. Loss of habitat and lack of initiative are.
i agree and disagree as well a good ground start would be to get coyote #`s down because any birds released at this point just becomes a buffet for the foxes and the coyotes but on a bigger level yes you are correct.
 

Maggie&Max-GSP

New member
i agree and disagree as well a good ground start would be to get coyote #`s down because any birds released at this point just becomes a buffet for the foxes and the coyotes but on a bigger level yes you are correct.

I agree with you to the were supposed to turn almos 800 birds out at dillion state park our group of guys killed proably around 40 birds in the first week. since that i have made 5 trips there to come home without even a point.
 

XD-Generate

New member
Trying to organize my first hunt in the Middletown/Gratis area. I'll be in town around Christmas. Anyone know of a place I might be able to bag a few birds? I know there are a few local spots there just not sure if any are worth checking out. I must say stomping around in the woods all morning is fun no matter what but I want the best chances. THanks in advance guys.
 

gobucks

New member
Not a fan of them relasing birds. Wonder how much money they spend each year on 15,000 pen raised pheasants. Would much rather see the DOW apply that money to buying more WPA's.
 

huntsem

New member
Using Pa. as an example you'll find that supplying an adequate number of put and take birds is a good investment in maintaining interest in upland sport hunting and in gathering support for future funding of related wildlife habitat projects. When the released birds are raised and released in the proper environments it's all the better because they have much better survivability so you get more "bang for the buck". There is sound reasoning behind the practice of State Game operations releasing birds and many midwestern states do it for good reason.

You can find very up to date and accurate information about why Pa. has a goal of releasing 250,000 plus put and take pheasants annually through upgraded facilities and rearing methods on Pa.'s Game Commision's web site HERE. In the past couple of years I've noticed that when the Pa. Game Commission releases birds in Pa. and the birds have good food and cover available they often survive well into Feb. even when there's allot of snow... (and Pa. undoubtedly has coyotes too)
 
Top