What is the best pair of boots you ever owned for hunting pheasants?

BTW, I've owned Irish Setter, Danner, Red Wing, and brands I cannot remember.

This was demonstrated for me far too late in my hunting career: go to an outdoor store. Lift as many pairs of boots as possibe. Then life pairs by Zamberlan and Keetrek. They're about twice as heavy for a reason.

If I knew that trick 30 years ago, I could have saved a fortune.

Zamberlan and Kenetrek are legacy boots. Your kids will hunt with them on.
 

Weimdogman

Well-known member
BTW, I've owned Irish Setter, Danner, Red Wing, and brands I cannot remember.

This was demonstrated for me far too late in my hunting career: go to an outdoor store. Lift as many pairs of boots as possibe. Then life pairs by Zamberlan and Keetrek. They're about twice as heavy for a reason.

If I knew that trick 30 years ago, I could have saved a fortune.

Zamberlan and Kenetrek are legacy boots. Your kids will hunt with them on.
Who wants to wear heavy boots?
 
Who wants to wear heavy boots?
Hunt the Rockies wearing comfortable, heavy boots that will withstand treacherous hunting conditions, and you'll never again wear lightweight boots.

I learned the uncomfortable and expensive way.

It might be wise to learn from my mistakes, and I've made a lot of 'em.
 

Weimdogman

Well-known member
Hunt the Rockies wearing comfortable, heavy boots that will withstand treacherous hunting conditions, and you'll never again wear lightweight boots.

I learned the uncomfortable and expensive way.

It might be wise to learn from my mistakes, and I've made a lot of 'em.
You hunt pheasants in the Rockies ?

I hunt pheasants in S.
Dak. and my boots get heavy enough with mud and snow.
 

remy3424

Well-known member
I have never considered weight in my boots, but I also don't consider the weight of my gun. It seems this is an issue for many, guessing either the younger ones or the oldest ones are looking at this. I am quickly becoming part of the older ones. I will be looking for a new pair this off season as I just discarded 4 pairs of the lace-up boots. Just prior to season, I threw-out my worn-out Danner PHs. I started with a pair of cheap nylon/cordura boots that I worn a couple time last year, that after a few weeks this season had holes worn through the material. Then I pulled out a old (maybe 15 years-but unworn) pair of Rocky boots, after a several weekends the sole peeled off one. It sucked throwing these out, as they still looked new. Then I pulled out a equally old, maybe older, pair of tall Lacrosse boots, worn these up to the last weekend, then I notice a sole was about to come off one those! The glue must dry-out on that design of boots. So, I laced up the cordura boots, after a couple wraps of duct tape that kept the snow out, but left my feet soaked after each of my last 2 hunts. We will see how my finances do, on whether I try a cheap pair to get by or go with a deluxe pair. A bunch of good options out there it seems. I view the lightweight options as glorified tennis/leisure shoes and likely will not stand-up to the hunting conditions I experience, so what I imagine I will choose will likely have so heft to them. I don't want to feel a rock pressing into my foot when I step on it.
 

Weimdogman

Well-known member
So I presently wear Itasca style 5543251. They are 500g thinsulate 8" lace up boots. They are cheap under 60.00. They are light and for me very comfortable to wear . I have hunted in all kinds of boots,parlor,cowboy,hiking,mickey mouse(army),and often hip waders. I have hunted all winter thru snow in tennis shoes. I try and always wear high quality warm wool socks.

I have problems with my hips so I am sensitive to weight/resistance on my legs. I can hunt cold and wet ,but I can't walk if my hips get bad. I don't like Cordura pants for this reason.

Today I hunted a cattail slough that required a short hike thru and sometimes over 3' deep snow. The slough had 1 to 2' of snow almost everywhere. It was 34° with a 6 to 10 mph breeze. I came out with 2 roosters sweaty clothes and pants wet from mid thigh on down. My feet were warm and dry and my hips fine after a hour circling around out there.
 
Hi remy3424.

Written by an experienced hunter.

Time has not altered the bromide: you get what you pay for, and I wasted a lot of $$$ trying to make the less expensive perform like the boots I should have bought at the getgo.

BTW, my Kansas pheasant guide was wearing what looked to be heavy boots.
You hunt pheasants in the Rockies ?

I hunt pheasants in S.
Dak. and my boots get heavy enough with mud and snow.
The most important aspect is to prevent must and snow from leaking through your books.
 

Beretta Setter

New member
I have had a pair of the Browning Kangaroo Upland boots for more than 15 years. Lightweight and tough, waterproof with light insulation. Had new soles put on them after 10 years. Browning no longer sells these. Orvis was selling a very similar boot so I bought a pair from them as a backup, now Orvis no longer sells that boot. LL Bean selling a Kangaroo boot that looks similar. If you can find a pair of the Browning or Orvis boots used I highly recommend them.
 
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