Types of cover

mikeP

New member
I asked this question indirectly in another post but would like to ask again. I am a solo hunter with no dog heading to South Dakota for the first time next year. I understand the disadvantage of not having a dog. My question is, are there certain areas of the state where the cover is more conducive to hunting this way? I am hoping to hunt more in the eastern side of the state if that would work. Thanks in advance for your answers!

Mike
 

A5 Sweet 16

Well-known member
I'd say maybe the northeastern part of the state?? If only because of the unbelievable number of spots available (either public or w/ public access). With or without a dog, a solo hunter would be best served by a relatively small, irregularly shaped piece of cover. Something with some "structure" you can play to your advantage & limit a rooster's options as much as possible. I'm not real familiar w/ that part of the state, but I'd think your odds of finding a little spot like that would be improved up there.
 

mikeP

New member
I'd say maybe the northeastern part of the state?? If only because of the unbelievable number of spots available (either public or w/ public access). With or without a dog, a solo hunter would be best served by a relatively small, irregularly shaped piece of cover. Something with some "structure" you can play to your advantage & limit a rooster's options as much as possible. I'm not real familiar w/ that part of the state, but I'd think your odds of finding a little spot like that would be improved up there.
Thanks!
 

BigRand

Active member
A number of the CREP areas can be fairly small in size and make it easier to corner a rooster with one person. Don't pass over the big areas as some of them are half mowed thus making them good places to trap a bird or two without an exit.
 

Haretrigger

New member
I will throw this out for what it's worth.....
I have good dog(s) and can't/won't hunt upland birds w/o them...I know that doesn't help you.
But...I do chase the occasional anterless wt deer if I can get a leftover tag. Obviously I do that sans dog.

I often get to my ambush spot before daylight. All the deer come out, along with the pheasants and it's a real hoot to watch and see where they appear.....also tells me where to come back and look for a rooster once the deer all go lay down...
One morning I decided to take a little walk after the sun had been up a little while, and I wasn't seeing any deer. I had seen 1 or 2 roosters on the edge that I intended to walk. Unlike my walking style with the dogs, I kind of pussyfooted fairly slow along the edge of the crp/cut crop for almost 1/4 mile.Didn't kick up a bird or a deer......my "edge" was coming to an end in a hundred yards or so, and it was all grazed down pasture after it ended.
Walked right up to the edge of that pasture....stood around for a half minute or so and had pheasants squirting out practically from under my feet..Could have shot a limit rght there...

This "edge" was adjacent to 3 full sections of crp...
I will leave you with 2 thoughts......1) pour over sattelite imagry and find cover that ends in no cover....2) walk it to the end and be patient.
I still remember the rooster in KS that got away because I thought there was nothing there and it was a good time to take a leak.....
 

mikeP

New member
I will throw this out for what it's worth.....
I have good dog(s) and can't/won't hunt upland birds w/o them...I know that doesn't help you.
But...I do chase the occasional anterless wt deer if I can get a leftover tag. Obviously I do that sans dog.

I often get to my ambush spot before daylight. All the deer come out, along with the pheasants and it's a real hoot to watch and see where they appear.....also tells me where to come back and look for a rooster once the deer all go lay down...
One morning I decided to take a little walk after the sun had been up a little while, and I wasn't seeing any deer. I had seen 1 or 2 roosters on the edge that I intended to walk. Unlike my walking style with the dogs, I kind of pussyfooted fairly slow along the edge of the crp/cut crop for almost 1/4 mile.Didn't kick up a bird or a deer......my "edge" was coming to an end in a hundred yards or so, and it was all grazed down pasture after it ended.
Walked right up to the edge of that pasture....stood around for a half minute or so and had pheasants squirting out practically from under my feet..Could have shot a limit rght there...

This "edge" was adjacent to 3 full sections of crp...
I will leave you with 2 thoughts......1) pour over sattelite imagry and find cover that ends in no cover....2) walk it to the end and be patient.
I still remember the rooster in KS that got away because I thought there was nothing there and it was a good time to take a leak.....
Thanks Hare trigger. Very interesting, and informative story, with a funny ending!
 

gimruis

Active member
Without a dog, the stop and go method is your best strategy. They'll get nervous when there's silence and often flush. I used to hunt for years dogless and I still harvested a pretty good amount of roosters. More roosters than a lot of people I know who had a dog to be honest.

I'd rather hunt without a dog than with one that isn't trained properly or doesn't listen. But that's another topic for another day.
 

marn

Member
NE part of the state does have a number of smaller CREP pieces that you may be able to push birds to the edges or end of cover. As mentioned walk slow, stop, zig zag and even circle around a good patch of cover. Also without a dog park and walk a minimum maintenance road ditch up one side and back along the other fence line.
 
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