Leather Prong Collar tighntness

Mr_Tibbs

New member
I just bought the small leather prong collar from GDS for my Brittany and am unsure of how tight it should be for training. The collar is leather, with 1/4 long blunt metal studs on the inside. I got the smallest size, which should be good for him since he is only about 40 lbs. But I wasn't sure if I should have it snug on his neck, then tighten for correction, vs having it on the loosest setting and then tightening from there for correction with a gentle tug on the leash? On the loosest setting, it gives him more slack and is probably more comfortable. I'm just wondering if its tighter, will he be able to associate "turning the pressure off" as much? It seems like going from loose to tight in correction demonstrates the point better, but it is really loose on his neck doing it that way. Does anyone have experience with these collars and the appropriate fit for training purposes?
 

Gatzby

Active member
I've never seen or used a leather prong collar but I assume its a Martingale collar or similar. Originally I think these collars were designed for greyhounds because of their long "fragile" necks but some wise entrepreneur added hidden prongs so fido could go to the dog park without PETA people crucifying the owner. Unfortunately the corrections aren't very clear and become a nagging inconvenience to the dog not a behavior changer.
I would strongly recommend a traditional prong collar. With a traditional prong collar corrections can be as weak or strong as necessary and much more timely as they slide more easily. They look aggressive and should never be used for anything except on lead training but at least you the trainer control the level of correction. A good way to look at is...... Is one clear concise behavior changing correction more humane then hundreds of nagging ineffective corrections.
 

G-Texan

Member
I've never seen or used a leather prong collar but I assume its a Martingale collar or similar. Originally I think these collars were designed for greyhounds because of their long "fragile" necks but some wise entrepreneur added hidden prongs so fido could go to the dog park without PETA people crucifying the owner. Unfortunately the corrections aren't very clear and become a nagging inconvenience to the dog not a behavior changer.
I would strongly recommend a traditional prong collar. With a traditional prong collar corrections can be as weak or strong as necessary and much more timely as they slide more easily. They look aggressive and should never be used for anything except on lead training but at least you the trainer control the level of correction. A good way to look at is...... Is one clear concise behavior changing correction more humane then hundreds of nagging ineffective corrections.
I agree.
 

david0311

Active member
I've never seen or used a leather prong collar but I assume its a Martingale collar or similar. Originally I think these collars were designed for greyhounds because of their long "fragile" necks but some wise entrepreneur added hidden prongs so fido could go to the dog park without PETA people crucifying the owner. Unfortunately the corrections aren't very clear and become a nagging inconvenience to the dog not a behavior changer.
I would strongly recommend a traditional prong collar. With a traditional prong collar corrections can be as weak or strong as necessary and much more timely as they slide more easily. They look aggressive and should never be used for anything except on lead training but at least you the trainer control the level of correction. A good way to look at is...... Is one clear concise behavior changing correction more humane then hundreds of nagging ineffective corrections.
Agree 100%.
 

Dakotazeb

Well-known member
I've never seen or used a leather prong collar but I assume its a Martingale collar or similar. Originally I think these collars were designed for greyhounds because of their long "fragile" necks but some wise entrepreneur added hidden prongs so fido could go to the dog park without PETA people crucifying the owner. Unfortunately the corrections aren't very clear and become a nagging inconvenience to the dog not a behavior changer.
I would strongly recommend a traditional prong collar. With a traditional prong collar corrections can be as weak or strong as necessary and much more timely as they slide more easily. They look aggressive and should never be used for anything except on lead training but at least you the trainer control the level of correction. A good way to look at is...... Is one clear concise behavior changing correction more humane then hundreds of nagging ineffective corrections.
Here's the leather prong collar I've seen trainers using.

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Gatzby

Active member

Mr_Tibbs

New member
That's the exact one that I have. I guess I wouldn't call that a Martingale style collar, more like a slip style collar with prongs for correction. For the record, it doesn't take much for correction with my dog so far to get him to adhere to a command. It seems to be doing its job during on lead training sessions, but I'm just not sure if I'm using it properly for his neck size.
 

Labs

Active member
For the record, I never use a metal linked choke collar and never will. If you've ever seen the damage they can do to a dog when employed by someone who doesn't know how to use them or purposely abuses them, you know why...

I use a (leather) pinch collar when teaching formal OB (sit, heel, walking heel). I put it on fairly loose and control the pinch with the slack used in the lead. If the pup is walking at heel properly, I allow the collar to remain loose so the pup doesn't get pinched. If it's pulling or lunging, I shorten the lead so it pinches itself when it does and give the command "Heel". When I stop walking the pup is required to immediately sit at heel. If it doesn't, a very slight tug causes the collar to pinch, at the same time I give the command "Heel". They figure it out pretty quickly...

BTW, tip for the new trainer. When doing lead training with dogs or horses, hold the excess lead doubled over in your off hand and control the length to the collar or halter in the other. Never put the loop around your wrist. The first time your dog lunges and tears the hide off your wrist with the loop, or worse yet, your horse takes off, drags you, and dislocates your shoulder, you will understand why not...
 
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V-John

Active member
IMO, a leather pinch collar is much more timely because they slide much much easier then a chain. At least that's my experience with them. Leather prong collar should be loose and tighten for corrections. Just a light pop.
 
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