Kansas Trespassing Fee for Private Land

KSnative

Active member
I don't know, not my skill set. But wasn't there something about the spotted owl in old growth forests and whales and wolves, etc. I'm just saying play politics with what draws the attention. Who can't like butterflies, play that card.
Yes - be very careful what "help" you wish for. How DID that spotted owl thing work out for - well, pretty much everyone and everything else? And not sure how well it worked out, even for the spotted owl. Are any left unburned by "unmanaged" forests? A poor trade, at best.
 
Although many of the arguments made thru out this thread are valid, none really get at the root cause....I will be 62 in a couple of months...my wife has a few years on me....so what, you ask ?
Well, the population of the u.s. has already doubled in her lifetime and almost doubled in mind. The western state where I graduated now has 10....yes 10...x the population it did when I moved there in 69..
Please Spend an hour on google disecting some of the demographic stats around the country and you can understand that the knot in your stomach from feeling things are out of wack is real....very real. You are not imagining things.
Increasing population, combined with increased wealth and mobility has continually changed this country for well over 200 years. I did not appreciate that reality back in the early 90's when I made my first trips to kansas and nebraska, and by the later 90's, the dakotas
.. that reality is not somewhere in the future at some place to be determined....it is with us in the here and now..at every step..at every tick of the clock.
It's called change and it's a constant in life whether we like it or not.

The best we can do is to work hard to appreciate what we have right now and manage our expectations based on how things are now, not what they were 20,30,40 years ago.
I get out and use public lands across the west and alaska....Those public lands truly are a national treasure...something of a birthright I would go far as to say.
States in the midwest have very little public land.....again, google can give you the stats. As old timers pass on and family lands get sold off, less and less access will be available. It's a slow moving train wreck for sure, and unfortunately I don't see any good ways to slow or stop the train..
Not very positive or upbeat....sorry about that.

Go out and enjoy what you have right now...
 
Although many of the arguments made thru out this thread are valid, none really get at the root cause....I will be 62 in a couple of months...my wife has a few years on me....so what, you ask ?
Well, the population of the u.s. has already doubled in her lifetime and almost doubled in mind. The western state where I graduated now has 10....yes 10...x the population it did when I moved there in 69..
Please Spend an hour on google disecting some of the demographic stats around the country and you can understand that the knot in your stomach from feeling things are out of wack is real....very real. You are not imagining things.
Increasing population, combined with increased wealth and mobility has continually changed this country for well over 200 years. I did not appreciate that reality back in the early 90's when I made my first trips to kansas and nebraska, and by the later 90's, the dakotas
.. that reality is not somewhere in the future at some place to be determined....it is with us in the here and now..at every step..at every tick of the clock.
It's called change and it's a constant in life whether we like it or not.

The best we can do is to work hard to appreciate what we have right now and manage our expectations based on how things are now, not what they were 20,30,40 years ago.
I get out and use public lands across the west and alaska....Those public lands truly are a national treasure...something of a birthright I would go far as to say.
States in the midwest have very little public land.....again, google can give you the stats. As old timers pass on and family lands get sold off, less and less access will be available. It's a slow moving train wreck for sure, and unfortunately I don't see any good ways to slow or stop the train..
Not very positive or upbeat....sorry about that.

Go out and enjoy what you have right now...
Good advise , no sence lamenting what we no longer have @ the expense of using what is available. FYI , I'm 58 and leaving for Kansas next Friday for a week. First trip of many I hope !
 

ten walker

New member
I would highly reccomend a shooting preserve in Mitchell co ks . the rates are very reasonable and it is more like hunting useto be in ks back when. It is a family operation and offers about any package you might desire from full service to a do it yourself hunt. They can also provide lodging .. These are wonderful folks and I believe any one would have a great time there. Special T in Tipton Ks 785-529-4081 specialThunting.com
 

KSnative

Active member
To each his own of course - but why travel anywhere if you are just going to shoot tame birds when you get there? I tried a few preserves, and even the best left me cold. If I want chicken, the Pollo Loco offers birds without shot and little feather balls in them; if I just want to pull the trigger, the better sporting clays facilities offer even more shooting. More challenging, too.
 

westksbowhunter

Well-known member
There has been a lot of WIHA that has been scalped within the last 2 weeks. Lots of private ground being tilled or scalped just this week. Hunting opportunities are disappearing quickly this fall and winter. I sure hope we have a good enrollment but things are looking very bleak.
 

ten walker

New member
Dont knock it till you have tried it. I have shot at other preserves and the Special T is not like any of them. This is as close to wild bird hunting I have had .
 

KSnative

Active member
Dont knock it till you have tried it. I have shot at other preserves and the Special T is not like any of them. This is as close to wild bird hunting I have had .
Why settle for "as close to" when you can take 10 steps in any direction in that area, and have the real thing? Seriously. What advantage(s) are you buying at Special T? Life is all about tradeoffs, but the only advantage I can see is the "bragging rights" stacked birds photo op at the end of the day. Personally - I'd rather bag one honest bird (or none) than 6 at any preserve, anywhere.
 

McFarmer

Active member
Personally - I'd rather bag one honest bird (or none) than 6 at any preserve, anywhere.
Then isn’t it a good thing everyone has the option that suits them best ?

I‘ve never understood this discussion. Some group of six want to go on a preserve that’s six fewer on the public ground or six fewer knocking on doors. Win/win.

I‘m just glad everyone doesn’t like what I like, if they did I couldn’t afford it.
 

tbob131

Member
I have no problem with people who go to preserves, it’s not for me but to each his own. What I don’t understand at all is driving for hrs to a state that actually has wild birds and then going to a preserve. No amount of explanation will make me get that.
 

Wolfchief

Active member
If you guys had a young dog to train and there were few to no wild birds around, your outlook on preserves might be a bit different. I'd love to be able to access several WHIA's or whatever you call public land with an hour's drive, but there's very little around here and even those places the DNR says have birds, don't. I live in the country and we have duck, deer and turkeys but quail or pheasants? Forget it!
Once I was a "wild bird" snob too; when there was upland game around and it was easy to be....now I can afford two or maybe 3 trips west each year. When I go, I want wild birds to shoot and I don't need to be jacking around for one or two of the 5 days of my trip, trying to find good places. So unless I have a local acquaintance who knows where to go, I use an outfitter. Some are better than others. We use our own dogs and shoot our own (wild) birds. Nothing at all wrong with that!
 

KSnative

Active member
I'm for sure in the live and let-live camp, but I think the point that may be getting overlooked is - not so much about bird snobbery, as difficulty in tracking the logic beyond days-long drives passing through mega-miles of wild bird country, just to visit a preserve.
 

Wolfchief

Active member
KS--If you, as the out-of-state hunter, know exactly where to go to find said wild birds without taking years and "costing thousands of lives" I would agree---though the last preserve I hunted on, I really couldn't tell the difference, and I've shot more than enough wild ones to know the difference. Even in my own country when seeking permission to hunt private land, most of the time the owner does not reside on the cover; you need to consult your plat book and phone book or local connections, to track the owner down. In my part of the world, it's even money that he hunts deer or has family who does, therefore after all the preliminaries, he'll be sorry but he'll still turn you down---and you can be SOL. I can't imagine the frustration that could ensue when trying to do all that in a state you're not familiar with....imagine yourself coming east to hunt deer or turkeys in an area you weren't familiar with. Hence, the outfitter makes sense for some of us....IF we're talking about wild birds.
 

KSnative

Active member
KS--If you, as the out-of-state hunter, know exactly where to go to find said wild birds without taking years and "costing thousands of lives" I would agree---though the last preserve I hunted on, I really couldn't tell the difference, and I've shot more than enough wild ones to know the difference. Even in my own country when seeking permission to hunt private land, most of the time the owner does not reside on the cover; you need to consult your plat book and phone book or local connections, to track the owner down. In my part of the world, it's even money that he hunts deer or has family who does, therefore after all the preliminaries, he'll be sorry but he'll still turn you down---and you can be SOL. I can't imagine the frustration that could ensue when trying to do all that in a state you're not familiar with....imagine yourself coming east to hunt deer or turkeys in an area you weren't familiar with. Hence, the outfitter makes sense for some of us....IF we're talking about wild birds.
If we knew exactly where to find the birds - that wouldn't be hunting. It would be visiting a preserve. :)
 

carptom1

Well-known member
I'm for sure in the live and let-live camp, but I think the point that may be getting overlooked is - not so much about bird snobbery, as difficulty in tracking the logic beyond days-long drives passing through mega-miles of wild bird country, just to visit a preserve.
Let the guy enjoy his time and money the way he wants Last I saw he wasn’t looking to have his logic analyzed. I am sure if he needs it you will be first on his list.
 

Wolfchief

Active member
You didn't answer my question about how YOU would feel if you had to come to my country and do what you're asking me to do---and as far as logic, all I see from some of you guys is a knee jerk negative reaction to anyone from out of state competing with you for hunting access.
 
Top