I want to take my first AZ/Quail hunting trip

andyperry07

New member
Hello all,

Wyoming resident looking to take my first AZ trip in dec/january for quial, I only have one dog so light on dog power, but would love to give something d ifferent a try. I chukar hunt up here so I do not mind a good walk.. haha.. any advice woudl be greatly appreciated.


thanks,

Andy
 

jmac

Super Moderator
Andy,

You need to be careful hunting your dog in Arizona. There are all kinds of plants, that are not dog friendly. Dog boots will help. Good luck to you on your hunt.:)
 

andyperry07

New member
Thanks again J Mac!! I planned on getting the boots as we hunt some pretty hairy country here. I know bird numbers are down but that seems to be an almost nationwide problem and I am ready to hunt some upland birds besides roosters.

Thanks
 

jmac

Super Moderator
Andy,

I don't think you understand me. I don't run dogs , down here. They are of little help. These birds don't hold, they run, and run and run. Dogs are of no help. They flush the birds out of range. I will state that any one that hunts a dog down here is insane. the vet bill will kill you. This is no joke. Read the QF mag for 2014 spring mag Valley of the son chapter of QF Mag.:)
 

gsppurist

Member
What area are your looking to hunt or what species?

The dogs can put you on birds but they can also make them flush out of range. Break up the covey first then use the dog to track singles. You will recover more cripples with the dog.
 

gsppurist

Member
Is there a link to this article. I couldn't find it.

Andy,

I don't think you understand me. I don't run dogs , down here. They are of little help. These birds don't hold, they run, and run and run. Dogs are of no help. They flush the birds out of range. I will state that any one that hunts a dog down here is insane. the vet bill will kill you. This is no joke. Read the QF mag for 2014 spring mag Valley of the son chapter of QF Mag.:)
 

Frangler

Member
Andy,

I don't think you understand me. I don't run dogs , down here. They are of little help. These birds don't hold, they run, and run and run. Dogs are of no help. They flush the birds out of range. I will state that any one that hunts a dog down here is insane. the vet bill will kill you. This is no joke. Read the QF mag for 2014 spring mag Valley of the son chapter of QF Mag.:)
I guess I am insane then? I have never had a problem with my dogs down there. Be sure they are snake broke and have well conditioned feet. I have shot plenty of quail over pointing dogs in AZ and I would never hunt with out a dog down there. If the snakes are out heavy don't hunt a dog but later in the season you are less likely to see any.
 

gsppurist

Member
I remember those Cholla Cactus well from my walks in the Desert.
You don't bump into them, they bump ito you. :eek:
Carry a fine tooth comb and a leatherman with you. It makes pulling cholla a breeze.

When I was at U of A and heading to Glendale for weekend family gatherings, I would routinely hunt with my dog around a mountain near Picacho Peak/Park Link Road in Sandals and shorts. The cholla there would catch my sandal then during the swing of my leg embed in the opposite calf.

Oh the good old times. Late for family dinners and scratches all over my legs. Dog slept...lucky him.
 

andyperry07

New member
I am hoping to hunt some Mearns/Scaled quail and maybe hunt some gambels. I thought using dogs was common, but I also know nothing about quail hunting. Just really looking for a different experience thanks for the advice so far I appreciate it!!
 

gsppurist

Member
Around Patagonia/Sonoita for Mearns. There is a hotel there that caters to hunters. They can help you with areas to try. Scalies are more to the east. I run into a few around Elfrida area but I knew some farmers which was helpful. Gambels all over. If driving from Tucson, north of Oracle or West of Tucson is good. Just find a wash and start walking.

I would target an area then do about one mile loops back to the truck,making a clover leaf pattern, then drive down the road and do the same.
As always, be ready to shoot birds even when approaching the vehicle. There have been times I unloaded and as I walked up, having quail run under my truck.
 

Frangler

Member
Carry a fine tooth comb and a leatherman with you. It makes pulling cholla a breeze.

When I was at U of A and heading to Glendale for weekend family gatherings, I would routinely hunt with my dog around a mountain near Picacho Peak/Park Link Road in Sandals and shorts. The cholla there would catch my sandal then during the swing of my leg embed in the opposite calf.

Oh the good old times. Late for family dinners and scratches all over my legs. Dog slept...lucky him.
Some of the best advice a dog owner could get for hunting down there. Combs save the day.
 

andyperry07

New member
Thanks for the advice.. do happen to know the name of the hotel GSP? And what type of comb is best for the plantlife down there?
 

gsppurist

Member
Thanks for the advice.. do happen to know the name of the hotel GSP? And what type of comb is best for the plantlife down there?
I camped when there but about a year ago, I found an Inn that catered to dog hunters. I thought it was the Sonoita inn but can't find their website any longer.

Any cheap comb will do. Carry a couple so you can comb your own hair. Bird hunters need to look good to kill birds or to keep their eyebrows and nose hair well groomed.
 

gsppurist

Member
In regards to hunting in Cholla, The dogs can get caught up in them but learn pretty quick. My dog made it through some pretty thick forests of Teddy bear cholla unscathed once he learned. Check their pads often, even if not limping. You will be amazed at how stoic your dogs are.

I tried to avoid large spreads of cholla but the birds go where they can to escape despite all good intentions. It is possible. Snake breaking is a must. My dog bumped 3 rattlers during the season. They don't mess them if you don't either.
 

andyperry07

New member
Thanks again on.. on the stoic part I completely agree.. was working with Riser (my WPG) this March and he cut himself open all the way down his chest and never whimpered, limped or complained.. I did not notice till we got home and he was dripping blood.. I saw how bit the cut was and was shocked. Took almost 50 stitches to close....its amazing how soft he seems at times, then other times he is tough as nails especially when looking for birds. I hope the rains find you guys in AZ soon as well as KS, CO, TEXAS...well almost everywhere.
 

gsppurist

Member
I am hoping to hunt some Mearns/Scaled quail and maybe hunt some gambels. I thought using dogs was common, but I also know nothing about quail hunting. Just really looking for a different experience thanks for the advice so far I appreciate it!!

When are you planning on hunting Mearns this season?
 

jmac

Super Moderator
I hunt the central part of Arizona. The cholla is where the birds are at. They know nothing will chase them into the cholla forests. The brits that hunt on the QF hunt last year where covered will cholla. I ask the dog owner to change Directions to git his dogs out of that mess. Poor dam dogs drive was amazing. One of them had cholla pinning its ears together.
 

oldandnew

New member
i think dogs new to an area will suffer until they get used to it. It can be brutal, and not for the faint hearted! I have used my dogs in Arizona, New Mexico, Nebraska Sandhills, Red Desert of Wyoming. Got solid points, avoided rattlers, porcupines, prickly pear, inside the legs and tail, sand burrs, spanish bayonettes, all manner of desert skews, most of whom I don't know. Dogs overcame them all. A little sadder and wiser when they came out. I hate to say it but the breed is an issue, because it makes me sound like a racist! I enjoy all pointing dogs, and I would not want to discourage anybody, I believe horse for courses, some I would not take into that breach. To gather my meaning, some dogs are frothing at the bit in the car, unless you are reckless, you can open the door without risk in a Missouri farm field! Probably not the dog for dangerous conditions, ditto the dog who runs into a cut corn stalk and gets impaled. This is not a my dog is better than your dog blog, nor do I want to make it one! Just food for thought, you know your dogs, and there capability. Remember there are stickers which will go through your boot sole, or pierce 9 ounce brazilian bullhide uppers. Consider that on a dogs flank. If you have snake trouble, and can't stop a dog, go later and on cooler days. I have see multiple dozens of rattlers with two dogs on the ground, September, north of Savory Wyo. all concentrated going to the den, dogs and I chose a different canyon! Heeled out, unleashed with no incidence from at least a dozen rattling snakes, others I could see but were undisturbed. I have see rattlers in dog range, ( and ME range) all states west of the Missouri River. Some dogs are hard luck or hard headed or both, but if he's your buddy, put him in a spot to succeed and reduce your stress. I have no theory of snake breaking a dog, I have seen a reckless, now one eyed bitch who would wail any porcupine any where any time, with disaster , I doubt the porcupine professor would have had any result! Anti snake venom is iffy, and in my opinion with injection site issues, organ failure, and a short, and I mean short life span, not worth it. One the other hand I hunt, if a heart attack gets me out in the desert, I'm gone too! Risk-reward!
 
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