Hun Habitat Bighorn Basin

andyperry07

New member
Hey all I live in Pavillion and have had some luck on roosters. Looking to expand my game species this fall, just wondering what hun habitat even looks like in the Bighorn Basin. I know it will not look the same as Montana, so I am just wondering what to look for and if any populations do exist on public land or do I need to knock on doors.. thanks in advance. If you need any input on roosters in Fremont County let me know.

Thanks


Andy
 

oldandnew

New member
Andy, I hate to sound sarcastic, but really it is sage brush, hills with grasses, adjacent to crop lands. Especially alfalfa. Water nearby. Sounds like about everywhere. Start walking!
I certainly agree! The best gray partridge, (huns), are in Johnson County, in my experience, they can literally be anywhere in that part of the state, but they are disbursed over a large quadrant of land. In Johnson, I have found them in creek bottoms as low as you can get, and touching the snow line 3000-4000 feet up, in really short pasture, or not at all! any weather line shack, machinery abandoned, or corral with some brush or cedars around is premium hun spots. The confounded thing with hun's. is they can be everywhere, and the next season are gone! Must be a boom or bust cycle. When you find them, they will routinely fly in a pattern and circle around to the same original cover, you will lose some along the way, and then sometimes flush wild a couple of times then settle down and stand for a pointing dog. Great bird, in the habitat, which is spectacular, and in hand, or the frying pan! In Johnson and that area you'll need to get permission from private landowners who either have the property deeded or have the access to public ground of choice. I have not seen all Hun's follow this pattern, but they sure have in Wyoming.
 

jmac

Super Moderator
I certainly agree! The best gray partridge, (huns), are in Johnson County, in my experience, they can literally be anywhere in that part of the state, but they are disbursed over a large quadrant of land. In Johnson, I have found them in creek bottoms as low as you can get, and touching the snow line 3000-4000 feet up, in really short pasture, or not at all! any weather line shack, machinery abandoned, or corral with some brush or cedars around is premium hun spots. The confounded thing with hun's. is they can be everywhere, and the next season are gone! Must be a boom or bust cycle. When you find them, they will routinely fly in a pattern and circle around to the same original cover, you will lose some along the way, and then sometimes flush wild a couple of times then settle down and stand for a pointing dog. Great bird, in the habitat, which is spectacular, and in hand, or the frying pan! In Johnson and that area you'll need to get permission from private landowners who either have the property deeded or have the access to public ground of choice. I have not seen all Hun's follow this pattern, but they sure have in Wyoming.
This is spot on Johnson county. There are red legs their too.
 

andyperry07

New member
Thanks all I figured it was just a walking game which is no problem for me.... ahha private property is always a nerve racking proposition but I was surprised by a covey this off season after hunting season near pavillion... took me completely by surprise trying to make a go of it here in wyoming so looking for any species I can find hah.. I love watching my young dog work..
 

andyperry07

New member
Yeah I have had that with pheasants often even last year.. or in wyoming the mystery property line scenarios that we have at times....when you come up this year driggs if i its a weekend you might have to stop in for one pheasant hunting on your way to thermop..
 

esetter

Member
Agree with all. We got into some huns in the Big horn foothills this last year. They came out of short sage , close too alfalfa. As stated above , they certainly seem to know where you don't have permission to hunt when the survivors fly off! EXCELLENT table fare for sure!
 
Top