Huberds Shoe Grease

oscar

Member
I ordered a can of Huberds and it arrived today. Going to set my boots out in the sun and our 100 degree temps tomorrow and apply the grease after they warm up. Will then let the sun help the leather to soak up the grease.
 
My order arrives tomorrow. Here's how I do it. I spread it evenly over the boots and than use a blow dryer to heat it up to where it nearly melts and rub it in. I do it a second time after 30 minutes and there good to go.
 

Rogue Hunter

Active member
I ordered a can of Huberds and it arrived today. Going to set my boots out in the sun and our 100 degree temps tomorrow and apply the grease after they warm up. Will then let the sun help the leather to soak up the grease.
What's temping you to try the Huberd's?
 

birddude

Well-known member
I've tried them all. Huberds is pretty good. I know I'm answering a question that wasn't asked but here's my two cents. Once a pair of boots start leaking nothing will stop them for long. Having said that you can improve flexibility, softness and help them from leaking to start with. I got this from YouTube and it's now all I use. I wear my boots a year or so, until the leather starts to dry up. Then melt down 2 1/3 bees wax toilet bowl rings. Add 8 oz boiled linseed. Then add about 20 drops of peppermint essential oils. Tics are not supposed to like the peppermint. I don't know if it works but it makes them smell good for a while. Heat up the boots with a heat gun and apply with a brush. Be careful its flammable.
 

Rogue Hunter

Active member
I've tried them all. Huberds is pretty good. I know I'm answering a question that wasn't asked but here's my two cents. Once a pair of boots start leaking nothing will stop them for long. Having said that you can improve flexibility, softness and help them from leaking to start with. I got this from YouTube and it's now all I use. I wear my boots a year or so, until the leather starts to dry up. Then melt down 2 1/3 bees wax toilet bowl rings. Add 8 oz boiled linseed. Then add about 20 drops of peppermint essential oils. Tics are not supposed to like the peppermint. I don't know if it works but it makes them smell good for a while. Heat up the boots with a heat gun and apply with a brush. Be careful its flammable.
That's quite the concoction. I ask because I'm hearing a couple poor reviews on Obenauf's regarding the lacing...I have a pair of books that the lacing broke, but they are ten years old, so there's that. So, just asking about the Huberd's...also thinking of trying Snow Seal on my next new pair.
 

BritChaser

Well-known member
if it's grease, might it reduce the friction between boots and cover haha
 

Wind River

Active member
Obenauf fan, oil or grease. I would generally wear out the toe of the boot long before the rest of the boot. Now I take the boots into a shoe shop and they apply what looks like bedliner, tough as nails. Toe of boot now wears like steel.
 

oscar

Member
I saw a lot of videos and didn't want to melt any products on the stove. I decided to try Huberds. I just want to keep my feet dry on 3 day hunt in SD. I am 75 and see no need of investing 3 or 4 hundred dollars in a new pair of boots. I have had these for 3 trips to SD. If I can't increase their "water resistance", I will buy a new pair just like them, Red Wings. Some years it is very dry and some are wet and some are a combination.

I also walk my Golden twice daily year round and sometimes I need to keep my feet dry on our trips to the park.
 

Rogue Hunter

Active member
Obenauf fan, oil or grease. I would generally wear out the toe of the boot long before the rest of the boot. Now I take the boots into a shoe shop and they apply what looks like bedliner, tough as nails. Toe of boot now wears like steel.
There is a product called "Tuff Toe", its a two part vinyl (?) that mixes in a syringe. Dries hard. I think it was originally developed for baseball pitchers' shoes. Now days its big with construction workers. First time I applied it to worn hunting boots to cover holes in the toes. It extended the useful life of the boots 3 years. My new pair of boots, first thing I did was apply the Tuff Toe, then oiled them.

I believe the last time I purchased some, it was $24-26(?) each, plus shipping. Available in 5 colors. You may be able to find it in larger sporting goods stores...I order it over the internet.
 

Pheasants & a Lab

New member
I like all natural on leather and not a chemical based. I use Obenaufs. The grease seems to have more substance than the oil. I like conditioning my boots so do keep them in good condition. I use a first coat with a hair dryer then another coat and put on the Peet boot dryer. I feel the boot dryer gives it time to soak in without too much heat. The bedliner can be purchased at most shoe stores. Buy a small can as it cannot be resealed and you won't us much. I was running around looking for things to put it on. ONE thin coat will do the job (it is bedliner). I put a second coat on and it is obviously rigid and I can feel some pressure on my toes. Keep it light and not too far up on top of the toe (if that makes sense) It has saved my 10 year old Russell Moccasins so put it on my Redwings as well.
 

Rogue Hunter

Active member
I like all natural on leather and not a chemical based. I use Obenaufs. The grease seems to have more substance than the oil. I like conditioning my boots so do keep them in good condition. I use a first coat with a hair dryer then another coat and put on the Peet boot dryer. I feel the boot dryer gives it time to soak in without too much heat. The bedliner can be purchased at most shoe stores. Buy a small can as it cannot be resealed and you won't us much. I was running around looking for things to put it on. ONE thin coat will do the job (it is bedliner). I put a second coat on and it is obviously rigid and I can feel some pressure on my toes. Keep it light and not too far up on top of the toe (if that makes sense) It has saved my 10 year old Russell Moccasins so put it on my Redwings as well.
In case someone wants to try that "bedliner", does it have a brand name?
 

cheesy

Well-known member
My millwright/welding buddies all use TuffToe on their boots to save the toes when kneeling on concrete.

Dad put it on a pair of moc toe Danner’s 3 years ago and they still look new after miles of walking through CRP.
 

matto

Active member
Here's one of them
I used a product like that (not that exact product) on a couple pairs of boots several years ago. It will definitely protect the toe from wear. As someone else implied, less is more when applying that stuff. Keep it close to the tip of the boot and don't put it on very thick. On the second pair of boots, I applied too much. Both too thick and too far back. Probably 2x if not 3x as much as needed. As a result, the boot flexed at a different spot. Ultimately the stitching failed exactly at the spot where it flexed. There was no noticeable wear at all on the toes...
 

oscar

Member
I applied my first coat of Huberds this morning and the boots are now sitting in the sunlight. The product had a consistency like motor oil and went on easily. I masked off the soles so they would not discolor. It has darkened the leather, but it is still brown. It does have a sort of smoky aroma.
 
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