Hearing protection

gimruis

Well-known member
I found out recently that my left ear has some permanent damage from shooting firearms. My right ear is fine but that's because its covered up when I shoot. I always wear muffs at the range but I don't wear anything when I hunt because I need to hear a deer walking, a turkey gobbling, or a pheasant flushing. The ear specialist said that the damage is at high frequency sounds and my hearing test confirmed this. Apparently there are plugs you can wear while you're hunting that allow you to hear normal sounds but muffle the loud damaging noise the gun makes when it goes off. If I don't do something about this its only going to slowly just get worse. Thoughts?
 

Kismet

UPH Guru
Foam plugs were developed for factory workers' safety and hearing health. They work great for hunting/shooting and muffle the louder sounds while still allowing most of the quieter sounds--like conversation--to be heard.

Cheap insurance.

Be well.
 

dakotasj

Active member
I found out recently that my left ear has some permanent damage from shooting firearms. My right ear is fine but that's because its covered up when I shoot. I always wear muffs at the range but I don't wear anything when I hunt because I need to hear a deer walking, a turkey gobbling, or a pheasant flushing. The ear specialist said that the damage is at high frequency sounds and my hearing test confirmed this. Apparently there are plugs you can wear while you're hunting that allow you to hear normal sounds but muffle the loud damaging noise the gun makes when it goes off. If I don't do something about this its only going to slowly just get worse. Thoughts?
Search "hearing protection" and you will find lots of discussion already in this forum.
I like Sound gear instant fit. Seems to be good protection and actually amplifies normal noise. Very comfortable to wear.
 
Search "hearing protection" and you will find lots of discussion already in this forum.
I like Sound gear instant fit. Seems to be good protection and actually amplifies normal noise. Very comfortable to wear.
Will I still hear my wife nagging me about wearing hearing protection?
 

mutthunt

Active member
I second what highvoltage uses. I'm on year 4 with mine, and they are still going strong. Use them every week during the summer for dog training. Only trouble is on really windy days, but that's life.

They have replaceable foam inserts, and I've found that the comply tips work the best for me.
 

Highvoltage

Active member
I second what highvoltage uses. I'm on year 4 with mine, and they are still going strong. Use them every week during the summer for dog training. Only trouble is on really windy days, but that's life.

They have replaceable foam inserts, and I've found that the comply tips work the best for me.
I bought some super comfortable replacement ear bud tips that can be worn all day.


 

mutthunt

Active member
I bought some super comfortable replacement ear bud tips that can be worn all day.


Those look like the same ones I use
 

Labs

Active member
I started hunting/shooting in the mid 60's, back when hearing protection wasn't even commonly used on ranges, let alone required. So between rock concerts (by the 80's I learned to always wear foam earplugs at indoor shows), the military, a 40 year LE career, flying light aircraft, and shooting god-alone knows how many rounds w/o hearing protection, my high frequency range hearing is pretty well shot.

I will say by the earl;y 80's I was wearing ear muffs on the range as well as plugs at rock shows and still do, but even now I don't like to wear hearing protection while hunting. I tried plugs and electronic muffs don't like them.

My wife on the other hand wears electronics muffs while hunting.
 

MetroGSP

Member
I bought a set of Tetra Hearing multi-pursuits last summer and used them last fall. They’re pricey, but great. They’re ANR, operate on hearing aid batteries, and only block out things like gun shots. Conversations can be had normally.
Developed by audiologists.
 

mutthunt

Active member
I bought a set of Tetra Hearing multi-pursuits last summer and used them last fall. They’re pricey, but great. They’re ANR, operate on hearing aid batteries, and only block out things like gun shots. Conversations can be had normally.
Developed by audiologists.
How do they do on really windy days?
 

Bird_dogz

New member
I found out recently that my left ear has some permanent damage from shooting firearms. My right ear is fine but that's because its covered up when I shoot. I always wear muffs at the range but I don't wear anything when I hunt because I need to hear a deer walking, a turkey gobbling, or a pheasant flushing. The ear specialist said that the damage is at high frequency sounds and my hearing test confirmed this. Apparently there are plugs you can wear while you're hunting that allow you to hear normal sounds but muffle the loud damaging noise the gun makes when it goes off. If I don't do something about this its only going to slowly just get worse. Thoughts?
Otto Noizebarrier work well. Seems to me they were around $350 or so. Worth saving your hearing.
 

John Singer

Active member
I work and volunteer in the shooting sports industry. I know that I have significant hearing loss.

I am very much interested in hearing protection for use while pheasant hunting.

I have tried electronic ear muffs. I find them to be cumbersome and the wind noise is annoying.

Yesterday at a high school trap shoot, one of the coaches put me on to the Otis Ear Shield. They are passive and allow ambient sounds while attenuating gun shots.

Hear is a comprehensive review:


I look forward to trying them in the field this fall.
 
Last edited:

birddude

Well-known member
I'm looking for some everyday hearing aids that have the function of shutting down the gunshots. so I don't have to switch back and forth. Any suggestions?
 

gettinbirdie

Active member
Bird dude -I've been searching for the right hearing aids also. Not as easy as it sounds. I would use my old oticons but moisture would kill them pretty quick. I've had them on while shooting in the past and they baffle out gunfire really well. I had an audiologist (hunts and shoots) turn me onto soundgear-I havent checked them out yet but will do when I get a chance.
 

Golden Hour

Well-known member
I have a pair of Walker Silencers. Good product, but I'd never wear them pheasant hunting. For the one man/one dog/public land game that a lot of us live for, the Silencers just don't allow enough ambient sound through, like the dog rustling in the cattails, etc. Tetras or some high end ones might, but I'll sacrifice a bit of my hearing if it means a couple more birds in the vest. That might sound stupid and it sure might be, but it is my feeling on the matter.
 

birddude

Well-known member
I have a bean I use for squirrel hunting, but I struggle to figure out direction with it. I can hear pieces of nuts hitting the ground ok but can't hear a squirrel rustling in the dry leaves right in front of me. I miss the insects at night and the songbirds in daytime. My low frequency is fine. I can hear a turkey or thunder as well as anyone. It's hard to believe with technology the way it is today, that it's hard to find one that will magnify what I need yet instantly shut down at high decibels like some shooting muffs. I have asked some of the major manufactures' and get some wired looks like that has never come up before.
 

A5 Sweet 16

Well-known member
I have a pair of Walker Silencers. Good product, but I'd never wear them pheasant hunting. For the one man/one dog/public land game that a lot of us live for, the Silencers just don't allow enough ambient sound through, like the dog rustling in the cattails, etc. Tetras or some high end ones might, but I'll sacrifice a bit of my hearing if it means a couple more birds in the vest. That might sound stupid and it sure might be, but it is my feeling on the matter.
Say what???? :ROFLMAO: I agree. I've tried at least 3 different types & neither allow me to hear what I want/need to hear sufficiently while pheasant hunting. Shooting clays? Sure. It's easy to shoot as much in an hour or two as you shoot all year hunting pheasants. In a duck blind with other guns nearby pounding away? Sure. But pheasant hunting? No. If a rooster flushes at 20 yards, whether I'm looking right at it, or if it's behind me, I need to hear it ASAP. I haven't found hearing protection that'll allow that. Among other things. If I'm not completely tuned in, I don't hunt/shoot as well, and I don't enjoy it 100%. That's unacceptable to me. It doesn't matter if it's hearing, thinking about work, having to worry about other hunters, or any other distraction. That said, if doctor's orders included hearing protection, maybe I'd change my tune.
 
Top