Deciding on breed

Scott2022

New member
Hi all. I am new to the forum. I am looking for my first bird dog. I mostly want a pointer for quail and likely pheasant in Az. I would love a pointer that also retrieves but not a deal breaker. I want a pup that will be low on shedding. not interested in labs or a Brittany. Have had both (Not hunting companions just pets) and have put them down after a long happy life. Wife says to sad to get another it will just make her think of our babies that are gone. I have been really looking at English setter and weimaraners. appreciate any advice.
 

BritChaser

Well-known member
it is my understanding that wirehaired pointing griffons do not shed. a friend has one and it does a workman like job afield. an English setter will shed like a Brittany. pointers, gsps, vizslas, and weims all shed but there is far less volume of hair than a Brittany say
 

Huede

Member
I got a griffon last June. They are excellent hunters and house dogs. They hunt at a nice slow pace which I like at 60. They are super smart and train well. If you want a dog to range far and run hard the griffon is not for you. As long as you brush them at least twice a month the shedding is minimal.
 

Dakotazeb

Well-known member
I wouldn't let the fact that you had to put your Brittany down deter you from getting another. If you are looking for a hunting dog for Arizona as well as a house pet it's difficult to beat a Brittany. All dogs are going to shed, but a good brushing frequently will minimize shedding. Another thing to consider since you apparently live in AZ is heat tolerance. However, if you are set on a Setter or Weimaraner I'd go with the Setter hands down.
 

A5 Sweet 16

Well-known member
I would love a pointer that also retrieves but not a deal breaker.
Some pointing dogs (notice I didn't say breeds) seem pre-wired to retrieve, but ALL dogs can be TRAINED to retrieve.
I'm a springer guy, but if I was forced at gun point to get a pointer today, I'd get a small Munsterlander.
With exception of the tail, they look quite a bit like springers, & the ones I've known have about the same brain power as a springer. :ROFLMAO::rolleyes:
My neighbor has them. They have great personalities, seem to receive training easily, & hunt well. This is Jet.
jets pool.jpg
 

Rude One

Member
I would look at a Vizsla or maybe a Braque. Both are shorthaired pointers that will retrieve. Some vizslas can get pretty crazy when they are young due to high energy but they are great with people and do well in the heat.
 
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Quailnerd

Active member
I love Weims, I currently have a great one, but please do not go cheap or take a chance on unproven parents. They have i high bust rate.
 

Scott2022

New member
This is really helpful. Thank you all so much for the advice. I am going to do some more research on griffons and braques. I do miss my Brittany. Was supposed to be a gun dog but my wife could not bear to send her to dog school. She does understand this one is going.
 

birddude

Well-known member
I would stick to a shorter coated dog due to the heat you're going to be hunting in. There is some debate on that, but it's been my experience they do a little better. Having said that, longer hair is easier to sweep up because those little needle-like hairs will stick in fabric like porcupine quills. Weims are quit striking but you will have trouble finding a good hunting line. I've only seen one Braques, he was an outstanding dog, but in my opinion not very pretty. At the end of the day, I'm with Mosby. I would look for a female shorthair with lots of white on her. White will reflect some heat and is easier to see. Have her spayed so you don't have to worry about marking, untimely heat cycles, etc. and you will have a fine hunting/pet and your house will be full of beautiful white porcupine quills.
 

BritChaser

Well-known member
I would stick to a shorter coated dog due to the heat you're going to be hunting in. There is some debate on that, but it's been my experience they do a little better. Having said that, longer hair is easier to sweep up because those little needle-like hairs will stick in fabric like porcupine quills. Weims are quit striking but you will have trouble finding a good hunting line. I've only seen one Braques, he was an outstanding dog, but in my opinion not very pretty. At the end of the day, I'm with Mosby. I would look for a female shorthair with lots of white on her. White will reflect some heat and is easier to see. Have her spayed so you don't have to worry about marking, untimely heat cycles, etc. and you will have a fine hunting/pet and your house will be full of beautiful white porcupine quills.

good advice
 

Quailnerd

Active member
I chased quail near globe Arizona a couple years ago and it could have been the most unfriendly dog country I’ve ever hunted. Everything is sharp and it was 75 degrees at noon. If this is similar to your home range English pointer should be on your list.
 

GetTothePoint

Active member
I love Weims, I currently have a great one, but please do not go cheap or take a chance on unproven parents. They have i high bust rate.
I have always wanted one but have always worried about that. I've seen several over the years and only one I can remember deserved being let out the box. They are cool though.
 

A5 Sweet 16

Well-known member
I have always wanted one but have always worried about that. I've seen several over the years and only one I can remember deserved being let out the box. They are cool though.
Are Weimaraners particularly difficult to turn into decent pheasant dogs? Or particularly susceptible to poor breeding? I'm no expert, but I suspect that if you are, in fact, coming across a high percentage of "not so great" Weimaraners, it's likely not the breed or breeding that's the problem. 🤷‍♂️
 

Dakotazeb

Well-known member
Have you looked at this post?

 

GetTothePoint

Active member
Are Weimaraners particularly difficult to turn into decent pheasant dogs? Or particularly susceptible to poor breeding? I'm no expert, but I suspect that if you are, in fact, coming across a high percentage of "not so great" Weimaraners, it's likely not the breed or breeding that's the problem. 🤷‍♂️
Bred too heavy to the pet side was always my assumption. If I ever get another bird dog when my pack now has dwindled i'll look hard at them but it'll be from a good ole boy who hunts both parents and still has some fire in that blood!
 

Quailnerd

Active member
Are Weimaraners particularly difficult to turn into decent pheasant dogs? Or particularly susceptible to poor breeding? I'm no expert, but I suspect that if you are, in fact, coming across a high percentage of "not so great" Weimaraners, it's likely not the breed or breeding that's the problem. 🤷‍♂️
I made a lot of calls and did a ton of research to find a legit weim. There are a few breeders that make it there life’s work to make good dogs. 99% are bred to be pets, and I don’t blame anyone who passes on the breed due to this stigma…. BUT there is a weim at my house that can hunt with any dog in the field.
It’s so fun to drop him in front of strangers, watch them roll their eyes, then apologize at the end of the day. He is not normal and i may never have another due to the fact it’s all down hill from him. Matter of fact I just brought home a pudelpointer, so in closing it’s possible if your willing to roll the dice!
 

birddude

Well-known member
I made a lot of calls and did a ton of research to find a legit weim. There are a few breeders that make it there life’s work to make good dogs. 99% are bred to be pets, and I don’t blame anyone who passes on the breed due to this stigma…. BUT there is a weim at my house that can hunt with any dog in the field.
It’s so fun to drop him in front of strangers, watch them roll their eyes, then apologize at the end of the day. He is not normal and i may never have another due to the fact it’s all down hill from him. Matter of fact I just brought home a pudelpointer, so in closing it’s possible if your willing to roll the dice!
The Irish setter comes to mind. I'm old enough to hear about and see a couple great Irish setters. Being free to breed any dog any other comes with some unfortunate results some times. Hey Nerd I got an idea! weimerpointerdoodel?
 

Quailnerd

Active member
The Irish setter comes to mind. I'm old enough to hear about and see a couple great Irish setters. Being free to breed any dog any other comes with some unfortunate results some times. Hey Nerd I got an idea! weimerpointerdoodel?
🤦🏼‍♂️ I’m not that brave!
 
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